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"Perspectives of Time and Occupation: Experiences of People with CFS/ME" (Pemberton & Cox)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Dolphin, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    From: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14427591.2013.804619#.U8QSUJRkTmc
     
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  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I read this. There were bits that were a bit interesting, about people slowing down and finding meaning in different activities.

    But I found it slow going: I have nothing underlined until the "Findings and Discussion" section (after around 5 pages of text, excluding the abstract).

    There is a chance because I'm not familiar with the way of saying things, this is due to a lack of knowledge on my part. However, I can understand psychological papers generally. It reminded me of some sociological papers I have read where they talk in the abstract without it being clear exactly what they are saying or whether what they are saying is justified.

    Then when I got to the findings section, I found it more interesting, although they did revert occasionally to their earlier style.
     
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  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Because there is no control group, I think it could appear to others that the lives of people with ME/CFS before becoming ill were more abnormal than they actually were. I think lots of people try to squash a lot into their lives even if it's just rushing to watch TV, make time for computer games or whatever.

    The authors mention possible difficulties interpreting the data
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
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  4. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I appreciate sociological research, but a lot of this just looks like cherry picking to suit an interesting narrative.

    The key point, is that there are selection biases both in choosing the therapy, and choosing to participate in the study. This is where myths such as "CFS patients were former high achievers" etc start. It is not that CFS patients are more likely to be high achievers, but rather those that were are also more likely to be visible. Hence self-selection biases.
     
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  5. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Furthermore, even if we assume that the average CFS patient does in fact experience greater exhaustion/stress/difficulties before the illness, we do not know if this is a contributing factor, or a perception caused by a slowly progressing illness that hasn't yet become severe enough to become obvious. Perception as daily activities feeling more exhausting than before. A good portion of CFS cases have a slow onset, so one would expect there to be such a trend. This is why I'm against psychology studies - they do not actually give any answers while still making vague claims or suggesting things that can easily mislead the reader.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2014
  6. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    I'm not sure what this is supposed to mean, other than being utterly obvious. Staring at the ceiling when you can't get out of bed sure makes time slow down.
     

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