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Peptides?

Discussion in 'XMRV Testing, Treatment and Transmission' started by xrayspex, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. xrayspex

    xrayspex Senior Member

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    Does anyone know more detail about the use of peptides to treat disease, from reading or experience? I was intrigued to read about Candace Pert trying to get Peptide T out there over the years and that she may be talking with Judy etc (if I recall a thread right).

    I was surprised to just read about a Stanislaw Burznynski treating cancer patients with a certain peptide or amino acid, that some folks w/cancer he found are missing a certain peptide. Anyone know anything about this. I hate to admit I read it in an interview with Suzanne Somers, who I had come to the conclusion was a kook, but maybe not, if WPI was open to peptides it makes me think twice.

    Burzynskis treatment is called antineoplastons and he was in phase 111 clinical trials with FDA last I read but will google....
     
  2. xrayspex

    xrayspex Senior Member

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    from wikipedia:

    In 1967, at age 24, Burzyński graduated from the Medical Academy in Lublin, Poland, with an M.D. degree with distinction. During the same year he identified naturally occurring metabolites and peptides in blood and he found that there is a marked deficiency of these substances in cancer patients. He suspected these compounds might control cancer growth.[2][unreliable source?] In 1968, he received his doctorate, D.Msc, translated as the equivalent to a Ph.D., in biochemistry as one of the youngest candidates in Poland ever to hold both an M.D. and Ph.D.[3][4][unreliable source?]

    From 1970 to 1977 in Houston, his research was sponsored and partially funded by the National Cancer Institute. He authored and co-authored 16 publications, including five concerning his research on peptides and their effect on human cancer. Burzyński named these peptides antineoplastons due to their alleged activity in correcting and normalizing neoplastic, or cancerous, cells.

    In May 1977 Burzyński founded his clinic in Houston where he has since treated over 8,000 patients. He is also the president of the Burzyński Research Institute, where he continues research on antineoplastons.[5] Burzyński is the author or co-author of more than 250 publications, including 66 scientific publications. Burzyński holds numerous US patents for his treatments and inventions.[6]

    Antineoplaston therapy
    Antineoplaston is a term coined by Burzyński for the peptides and metabolites used in his alternative therapy. They are not generally cytotoxic, though the highest usage levels carry a very high sodium load that require careful attention to fluid and electrolyte balance.[citation needed] Burzyński's claims are that the antineoplaston peptides are species and genetically specific, so that treatment success depends greatly on whether the chosen agents match the patient's disease and that most animal trials are inherently not very meaningful.

    Burzyński was brought to court in Texas for treating patients with a treatment not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and for selling antineoplastons in interstate commerce.[7][8] In 1998 the Texas Attorney General, Dan Morales, placed limits on his advertising of antineoplastons.[9] and ordered him to cease and desist selling his products, without FDA supervised clinical trials.[10] Burzynski had appealed the limitations on his advertising on the grounds of free speech, but the appeal court upheld the decision, stating that "Burzynski's commercial speech does not concern a lawful activity."[7]

    Burzynski has also been found guilty of fraud, as he claimed reimbursement from a health insurer for an illegally administered cancer treatment.[10]
    Burzynski, released in June 2010, is a documentary film telling the story of Burzyński, his discovery of antineoplastons, and his legal battles. The film portrays him as "a stoic victim of patent fraud, government harassment and scientific sabotage
     

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