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Paleolithic people ate porridge

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by adreno, Sep 10, 2015.

  1. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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  2. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    I thought it was teffmeal.
     
  3. South

    South Senior Member

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    The study specifies that oats were found on the ancient tools they analyzed. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015
  4. whodathunkit

    whodathunkit Senior Member

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    Luvs me my porridge. Been eating steel cut oats for a couple decades but recently started eating "traditional Scottish oatmeal" from Bob's Red Mill. Very, very tasty, and I like the texture a bit better than the steel cut.

    Nice to see that dumb Paleo narrative of only meat, veggies, and fruit being smashed.
     
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  5. whodathunkit

    whodathunkit Senior Member

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    BTW, anybody know if there's any "resistant starch value" in cooling and reheating oats, in the way there is with potatoes and rice?
     
  6. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Unfortunately the only thing that makes me feel even worse than gluten is oats :depressed:
    I would love to have the tryptophan in it...
     
  7. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Modern day oats may be cross contaminated with gluten. If you're very sensitive you may be affected. There are gluten free oats available.
     
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  8. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Thanks Caledonia, I will look into it, but high fiber foods are usually too painful for me (vascular endothelium pain + GERD). Hopefully L-Glutamine will help me to get there.
     
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  9. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    @caledonia = right, as usual. :) Unless oats say GF, they are not.

    Only you can decide what is 'right' for your belly, @Gondwanaland ! A lot of that fiber is the soluble kind, though I'm not sure if your belly cares about that in particular...

    -J
     
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  10. panckage

    panckage Senior Member

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    Traces of gluten can be found in many different oats but gluten and oat intolerances are separate. It is common for people who have gluten intolerances to be intolerant to oats as well
     
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  11. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Yes, this is the main takeaway of the finding.
     
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  12. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    I think there is a lot less resistant starch in oats but there is some so presumably the cooking and cooling trick should increase it.

    I have added steel cut oats to my diet over the past few months and am really enjoying it. Think it has helped the gut too - better bms.
     
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  13. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Bedtime stories :thumbsup:

    But it doesn't change the fact that overeating carbs causes insulin resistance and nutrient malabsorption o_O A whole grain diet ruined my health :aghhh:
    And then a "paleo" diet rich in high oxalate tubers ruined it for the 2nd time :aghhh::aghhh:
     
  14. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Don't really want to 'LIKE' your post here as that seems cruel. I tried Paleo - destroyed my gut. It tired juicing - gut even worse, in agony rolling around the floor - we are all different. No one diet has helped me in the least, GF, dariy free, nada. so I eat whatever feels right and do no better and no worse for it.

    BUT even though GF makes no difference to my health or gut, oats are just awful for me - bloating almost immediately till I look 9 months pregnant. So unfortunately I don't partake.
     
  15. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    Very low carb grain free paleo destroyed my health. It took me a long time to figure out what was happening. It seems that once the gut has been destroyed it's very difficult to come back from that.

    I've been eating porridge lately and I'm liking the effects.
     
  16. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Ho much, how often, how do you prepare it? I will try it while taking glutamine... I have just learned (hopefully) to tell the difference between fiber and oxalate effects on my system, and the 1st seem to be remedied by glutamine, and the latter by B vits.
     
  17. whodathunkit

    whodathunkit Senior Member

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    FWIW, what I've learned and lived leads me to believe that liver health and over-intake of omega-6 fat play a BIG part in insulin resistance. Probably the biggest part, although I'm in no position to prove that. But I'm no longer convinced at all that the "demon carbs" are the main culprit. Instead, I think it's *added* omega-6 fat (in the form of oils used for cooking or garnishing) that are the problem. In part because they seem to have a very deleterious effect on the liver...although over-consumption of any fat is obviously not good for the liver, either. But omega-6 in particular. I also suspect that since grains contain omega-6 that may be why over-consumption of them seems to lead to insulin resistance. Plus, if you eat any processed food at all the food manufacturers sneak omega-6 oil into *everything*.

    However, my experience has been that eating a reasonable amount of complex carbs and unprocessed, unfortified grains as part of the diet without any added omega-6 oils does not pose a problem with regards to insulin resistance. I'd bet this is true for most people who don't react to grains/gluten unless their liver is already somewhat screwed. I say this as someone who is still battling some insulin resistance (although my sugars are pretty much normal except for first thing in the morning) and whose poor old liver has been put through the wringer. I'm hopeful, though, that after a couple more years of good clean livin' that my liver will be nicely rejuvenated and my insulin resistance will disappear completely. We'll see, I guess. Blood sugars certainly not getting any worse overall from eating a reasonable amount of potatoes, rice, whole oats, whole grain bread, honey, dates, sweet fruits, etc. What I'm NOT eating is any omega-6 except what comes naturally in the food.

    Also, if you're eating grains it's a good idea to supplement some fish oil or eat fatty fish a few times per week. Omega-6 needs omega-3 for proper lipid balance. Something about beneficial eicosanoid formation, prostaglandins, and lipid oxidation, but I don't remember it all right now. *sigh*

    BTW, if anyone's interested, Free The Animal has had a good series recently on the problems that processed fortified grains cause. I'm not entirely persuaded that they're the root of all our problems (I still think over-consumption of even unfortified grains can lead to over-consumption of omega-6 which is likely the biggest problem) but there's a lot of good info there and it is a very interesting hypothesis.

    Yup, me too. My health went downhill quite precipitously after my first flirtation with Atkins. With all the great things we used to read about low carb I couldn't figure out why my health was deteriorating instead of improving. :rolleyes:

    I sometimes wonder if the health of Western civilizations will ever recover from the butt-flaming nutritional stupidity we went through during the '70's, '80's, and '90's.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2015
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  18. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    Same here. :rolleyes: My first brief VLC ketogenic stint in 2003 was bad enough, but the second one in 2011-2012 left a wake of gut microbiome apocalypse so severe I still haven't recovered to baseline.

    :lol:
     
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  19. RS Queen

    RS Queen

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    I don't think that oat RS3 forms nearly as easily as potato or rice simply due to the fact that the starch content in oats is much less. The retrogradation is strongly impacted by other molecules that get in the way of the attraction and bonds of the glucose chains once they have been freed by cooking. The protein, soluble fiber and other components of oats would interfere with the retrogradation of the starch. I looked but did not find a reference for this opinion, but am pretty confident that any retrograded RS3 in cooked and cooled oats would be minimal.
     
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  20. RS Queen

    RS Queen

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    Minimizing refined carbohydrates does not reverse insulin resistance - it likely just prevents it from getting worse. In contrast, resistant starch significantly improves insulin resistance (see the U.S. FDA health claim petition submitted earlier this year at http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FDA-2015-Q-2352). Thus, under-eating fermentable carbs is the more likely culprit for causing insulin resistance. Deliberately adding 15-30 grams/day of resistant starch to your diet may help to reverse prediabetes (if you've got a reasonably fermenting colon). This is great news! By improving the insulin resistance, you may end up with a higher tolerance for a wider range of carbs because it treats the underlying condition.
     

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