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Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Injury in Chronic Multisymptom Conditions

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Marco, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. MDL

    MDL

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    It would seem to me that the following is rather on point:

    Antioxid Redox Signal. 2010 Jan;12(1):1-13.
    Hydrogen sulfide increases glutathione production and suppresses oxidative stress in mitochondria.
    Kimura Y, Goto Y, Kimura H.
    Source
    Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Neuroscience, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan. kimura@ncnp.go.jp
    Abstract
    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a synaptic modulator as well as a neuroprotectant in the brain. We recently showed that H(2)S protects neurons from oxidative stress by increasing the levels of glutathione (GSH), a major cellular antioxidant, by more than twice that of a control through enhancing the cystine transport. Here we show that H(2)S enhances the transport of cysteine to increase GSH production more than cystine transport and to redistribute the localization of GSH to mitochondria. The efficiency of GSH production enhanced by H(2)S is even greater by fourfold under oxidative stress by glutamate. H(2)S reinstated GSH levels in the fetal brain decreased by ischemia/reperfusion in utero. In addition, Neuro2a cells expressing a mitochondrial H(2)S-producing enzyme, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST), along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), showed significant resistance to oxidative stress. The present study shows that H(2)S protects cells from oxidative stress by two mechanisms. It enhances the production of GSH by enhancing cystine/cysteine transporters and redistributes GSH to mitochondria. H(2)S produced in mitochondria also may directly suppress oxidative stress. It provides a new mechanism of neuroprotection from oxidative stress by H(2)S.
    ----------
    As you can see from the above, hydrogen sulfide plays an important role in the production and distribution of glutathione in the brain and in the control of oxidative stress.
    I proposed that hydrogen sulfide plays a key role in CFS through the mitochondria and oxidative stress several years ago. This was confirmed by the work Rich referenced above. From my quick perusal, Dr. Golomb does not mention hydrogen sulfide (please correct me if I am wrong), but I think it is only a matter of time before we begin to see a fuller picture emerge, and my hunch is that it will include hydrogen sulfide.
    Marian
  2. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Hi Marian, i'm a bit confused by your post - are you saying that Hydrogen Sulfide is a GOOD thing? As far as i can tell H2S is a very poisonous toxic gas. Am i missing something?

    Thanks Rich for your input - do you feel then that the MCB is also happening in GWI? have you had any contact with GWI researchers?
    All the best, Justy
  3. MDL

    MDL

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    Hi Justy,

    What we are talking about here is something fundamental to the creation of life, like oxygen, and yes, it is critically important-- it is a toxin that is also beneficial to us in many profound ways. The research on H2S is developing very quickly, and the picture that is emerging is of a profoundly powerful gas that regulates many important functions in the body in both directions--it is both pro- and anti-inflammatory. I believe that people with CFS/ME have dysregulated metabolism of H2S, which can come about in a number of ways, not just through a preponderance of the wrong bacteria in the gut. Fundamentally, when the redox balance is shifted, the body utilizes oxygen in a much less efficient manner, and I think H2S is a key player in that process. If you really want to understand the multi-system manifestations of CFS/ME, I think hydrogen sulfide is an ideal candidate for a systems-wide approach, but it does require a paradigm shift in thinking...

    A big topic....but I hope this helps.
    Marian
  4. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

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    Seattle
    Hi Marian,

    Glad to see you back here. I've been intrigued by your hypothesis, even if I don't understand it very well. Your last reply helps in that regard, but I'm wondering what you propose as a solution. How do we increase our H2S...or DO we increase it, or is it something that will be metabolized and utilized better if one's methylation is functioning properly?

    Thanks in advance,

    Dan
  5. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Justy.

    I've been trying to interest the GWI folks into looking into glutathione depletion since 2003, and methylation since 2007. Lately there seems to be a little more interest. I would really like to see the methylation pathways panel run on a few of these vets. Hopefully it will happen.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  6. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Thanks Rich - it's good to see the dots joining up.
  7. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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    Near Cognac, France
    Any update mellster now that its a month plus in?

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