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Olive oils anti-inflammatory benefits linked to gene expression

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Rosemary, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. Rosemary

    Rosemary Senior Member

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    http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com...flammatory-benefits-linked-to-gene-expression

    Olive oils anti-inflammatory benefits linked to gene expression

    Related topics: Research, Antioxidants, carotenoids, Nutritional lipids and oils, Cardiovascular health

    Phenolic compounds in olive oil could help repress genes linked to inflammation, thereby providing a molecular basis for the reduction of heart disease risk already linked to the consumption of olive oil.

    The study, published in Biomed Central (BMC) Genomics, tested the impact of consuming an olive-oil rich breakfast in people suffering from metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of conditions linked to heart disease and diabetes.

    This study shows that intake of virgin olive oil based breakfast, which is rich in phenol compounds is able to repress in vivo expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, thereby switching activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a less deleterious inflammatory profile, wrote the researchers.

    These results provide at least a partial molecular basis for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease observed in Mediterranean countries, where virgin olive oil represents a main source of dietary fat.


    Previous studies had shown that the consumption of olive oil with a high phenolic content could help reduce pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-thrombotic markers compared with the consumption of low phenols virgin olive oil.

    The researchers of the current study set out to investigate whether the beneficial effects of olive oil could be linked to gene activity. Their approach was to identify expression changes in genes which could be mediated by olive oil phenol compounds.

    Study details

    The study, which followed a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design, involved 20 patients suffering from metabolic syndrome. After an initial six-week wash-out period during which participants did not take supplements, vitamins or drugs, they were fed two virgin olive oil-based breakfasts with high (398 ppm) and low (70 ppm) content of phenolic compounds.

    All participants consumed a similar low-fat, carbohydrate rich diet during the study period to eliminate potential impacts resulting from their usual dietary habits.

    After tracking the expression of over 15,000 human genes in blood cells during the after-meal period, the researchers identified 79 genes that were underexpressed (or turned down) by the high phenol olive oil, and 19 genes that were overexpressed (or turned up).

    Many of those genes have been linked to obesity, high blood-fat levels, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Importantly, several of the turned-down genes are known promoters of inflammation, so those genes may be involved in cooling off inflammation that often accompanies metabolic syndrome, writes the US Department of Agricultures Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS), which was involved in the study.

    The researchers concluded that their findings strengthen the relationship between inflammation, obesity and diet, and provide evidence at transcription level of control of healthy effects derived from virgin olive oil consumption in humans.

    However, they added that it would be interesting to evaluate whether these beneficial effects are maintained after prolonged feeding and if these effects are carried out by one or several olive oil phenolic compounds, or if they are consequence of a synergic effect of the total phenolic fraction.

    Source: Gene expression changes in mononuclear cells in patients with metabolic syndrome after acute intake of phenol-rich virgin olive oil
    BMC Genomics 2010, 11:253; doi:10.1186/1471-2164-11-253
    Authors: Antonio Camargo, Juan Ruano, Juan M Fernandez, Laurence D Parnell, Anabel Jimenez, Monica Santos-Gonzalez, Carmen Marin, Pablo Perez-Martinez, Marino Uceda, Jose Lopez-Miranda, Francisco Perez-Jimenez
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/253
  2. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    UK
    Interesting study results. I used to exist on the lowest fat diet known to man before becoming ill in the mistaken belief it was good for keeping weight down, I started having virgin olive oil about 3 years ago, I don't have any other fats in my diet apart from the little on chicken and turkey, don't eat red meat. I have about 4 tablespoons a day, have a lot of inflammation in my knees, neck, shoulders and spine, but I absolutely love it and splash it on all my food especially salads so good to read it may be doing something for me and I may be doing something right for a change!
  3. ixchelkali

    ixchelkali Senior Member

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    Long Beach, CA
    An interesting study, thanks for posting. I also believe in the importance of eating enough healthy oils. Unfortunately, this study was sponsored by the olive oil industry and by the Spanish government's olive oil ministry. I'm always a little more skeptical of studies funded by industries that stand to gain from the results. I'm not saying that the results are bogus, just that I don't accept them at face value.
  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Hi

    I have been trying to promote the benefits of extra virgin olive oil in CFS for over a decade. I use it as my main oil. It has many benefitical properties. Just be sure to buy local product from producers you trust, because some of the extra virgin sold around the world is anything but. Do not deep fry with it though, these temperatures will probably destroy its beneficial properties and make it toxic.

    Bye
    Alex
  5. Rosemary

    Rosemary Senior Member

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    Hi Alex,

    Do you think it could also be the fatty acid content in olive oil that helps patients with CFS ? ....Oleic acid is the main fatty acid found in olive oil...I would also be interested in finding out more about how retroviruses could use fatty acids to replicate therefore resulting in depletion of fatty acid levels...is this something that you have looked at ?

    Thanks from Rosemary
  6. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Hi Rosemary,

    Some of the enzymes that produce inflammatory hormones might be able to bind to omega-9 fats in olive oil, but because they don't do anything this will just low down this hormone production. This is uncertain, but not impossible although I looked into this research 10 years ago so I don't know if it is the current view. If its correct, this would be a dose dependent response.

    Extra virgin olive oil also has antioxidant and other properties. I am not an expert on it, but I felt better from taking it and have the view that if it might be helpful, and can relatively cheaply replace other oils that aren't, so its a good strategy just in case it is doing good.

    A few more comments: keep it in a cool place out of sunlight, but be aware that it partially freezes in a fridge. Also never eat rancid oil - if it tastes off throw it. It is also supposed to look a little green, thats normal (for those of you who have never tried it).

    I don't know if it interferes with XMRV replication or action. We need a lot more research. It will alter cell membrane properties, generally its a good thing. Unfortunately I am not very knewledgeable on murine leukemia viruses, so I don't know as much about them as I would like. Maybe I will know more later.

    Bye
    Alex
  7. Rosemary

    Rosemary Senior Member

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    Thanks Alex...I appreciate your response..we also use extra virgin olive oil and when we lived in Spain we used to buy our olive oil straight from the mill.... I agree the greener it is the better it is for you...a sediment in the oil is also a sign of a good oil...I am so glad to hear that taking olive oil makes you feel better !

    I use olive oil to help my son because I remembered reading about a doctor who used an olive oil/lemon juice mix to treat his patients with AIDS

    It was therefore no surprise to me then when I found out that it is the maslinic acid – found in wax from olive skin – which inhibits serin-protease, the enzyme used by HIV to release itself from the infected cell into the extracellular environment.

    Further information here for your interest Alex

    Best Wishes ... from Rosemary

    Compound From Olive-Pomace Oil Inhibits HIV Spread

    Olive oil has become part of the fight against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) – the cause of AIDS – thanks to the research carried out by the Bionat team, from the University of Granada, headed by Prof. Andrs Garca-Granados, senior lecturer in Organic Chemistry. Their work shows that maslinic acid – a natural product extracted from dry olive-pomace oil in oil mills – inhibits serin-protease, an enzyme used by HIV to release itself from the infected cell into the extracellular environment and, consequently, to spread the infection into the whole body. These scientists from Granada determined that the use of olive-pomace oil can produce an 80% slowing down in AIDS spreading in the body.

    Maslinic or crataegolic acid is a pentacyclic terpene with antioxidant and anticancer effects found in wax from olive skin, alongside oleanolic acid. The effects of this compound in the fight against AIDS are simultaneously being studied in the UGR and in Hospital Carlos III in Madrid by a team headed by Prof. Vallejo Njera.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070709111536.htm

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