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(Not ME/CFS-specific) "Patient Satisfaction Is Overrated"

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    More a general issue in health than specific to ME/CFS but I find it an interesting topic:
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/821288
     
  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I highlighted the following on another thread before:

    Extract:
    The PACE Trial investigators have sometimes referred to the relatively high satisfaction ratings they obtained.
     
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  3. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    Australia
    The question isn't really whether "satisfaction" is important, but whether this can be captured properly with a few questions in a questionnaire at a single point in time...
     
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  4. Hope123

    Hope123 Senior Member

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    One of my former bosses is an expert on surveys and outcomes. He told me that satisfaction surveys are skewed as the act of simply asking patients (or customers) about their satisfaction is often enough to increase satisfaction in and of itself. [This is a great marketing technique in fact.]

    Another problem with satisfaction in the healthcare field is unless the survey is well put together, satisfaction may have nothing to do with quality of medical care. Patients have and do judge satisfaction based on factors as disparate as having to pay for parking, whether the receptionist treats them politely, and how clean/ stylish the waiting room is.

    In fact, several years ago, researchers showed that patients were willing to switch docs based on higher parking rates at one facility and indeed, I saw this happen in the place I used to practice. We'd get "spillover" patients from the big city to our north because our parking was free and our city branch charged for parking.

    So for an overall pic, satisfaction is worth look at but not if the question is about quality of medical care, which it is being used as a measure for in some instances now in the US.

    Here's one post from Hopkins: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news...tay_does_not_reflect_quality_of_surgical_care

    And for those interested, the New England Journal of Medicine had a recent article last year on this topic.
     
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  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Also, I was perfectly satisfied with my medical care at first... virus knocks you about, but nothing to worry about as gradually increasing exercise reconditions body and teaches brain that the fatigue is not a real problem that needs to be paid attention to... it was only after finding that this didn't work for me my satisfaction dropped... and it was only years later, on reading more medical papers and seeing how vile and manipulative this initial 'management' was that I was truly able to assess my satisfaction with their care.
     
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  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Yes, good points.
    When medicine is privately paid for on an appointment-by-appointment basis, as happens with a lot of systems, or with complementary medicine, people will generally (not always) need to feel satisfied or they won't keep paying. But it's not a true picture of long-term satisfaction with treatment.
     
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  7. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    This also creates incentives to provide 'treatments' able to provide certain types of emotional, short-term 'satisfaction', regardless of whether they really serve to improve people's health.
     
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