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(Not illness specific) [JSTOR] Journal Archive Opens Up (Some)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    article continues at:
    http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/09/jstor-offer-limited-free-access-content-1200-journals

    Here's the link to sign up http://about.jstor.org/rr
    (COI Statement: I have no financial interest in any of these)
     
    Bob, alex3619 and Little Bluestem like this.
  2. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    A good start. :)
     
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Yes, a step in the right direction, its very encouraging. Also the reading limit is not such a big issue to someone like me: fully reading three detailed papers every two weeks is close to my limit most of the time.
     
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  4. Bob

    Bob

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    It looks like a promising new service, but not all the big-name journals have signed up to it yet.

    As an alternative way to find research papers, I've found that I can usually get hold of a copy of a paper published within a journal or a book, from my local large library through an inter-library loan from the British Library, for a small fee of about £3. The British Library has always had copies of books and journals that I've wanted, however obscure. (Copies of individual research papers/articles, from journals, can also be bought online from the British Library, but they cost normal-ish prices of about £20 to £30.)

    There's also this fairly new service, "deepdyve.com", which provides 'rented' research papers for a very large discount:
    http://www.deepdyve.com/
    I've never used it because they've never had an article that I've been looking for.
    They're offering a free trial at the moment.
     
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Hi Bob, the Australian public can do something similar through their state libraries. I did a few years back. That is not too bad if you only want one paper. Its not good if you want to read hundreds. I used to live a short walk from the biggest medical library in my state, back when I could still walk a little and afford to live in the inner city. It was great. Want a paper? Take a bus, walk a bit, photocopy, come home. Now its a three hour trip each way. Having online services available at little or no cost is great. However this idea that we can only read them not download them is nonsense and unenforceable. If we can read it we can download it, period, even if it requires screen dumps. Essentially what they are selling is convenience. If you want fast and easy, you pay. If its free then its inconvenient. This might actually be a good model, as the public is not in the same hurry (typically) as a busy professional who can afford to pay. Bye, Alex
     
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