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NIH.gov "Fatigue" (24 April 2015)

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Asa, May 1, 2015.

  1. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    From NIH.gov "Fatigue" (last update 24 April 2015): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003088.htm


    "CFS" is not included in the list of illnesses. Instead, information about fatigue and medication is listed, and then a note about "CFS" (not ME or SEID) is tacked on at the end.


    And followed immediately by (but presumably as "treatment" for all fatigue):

    Note: The Wayback Machine has a record of this page dating back to 2001. At that time, the term "chronic fatigue" was used within the general info on fatigue, but neither "chronic fatigue" nor "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" are listed with fatigue-causing illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" however links to a page on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, described as a "condition". (Alternative names includes Yuppie flu.)

    By 2004, it seems that "chronic fatigue" was replaced with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome on the fatigue homepage. Here too, it's described as a "condition" and is not included in the list of illnesses in which fatigue is a common symptom.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2015
  2. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    the fault likely lies with A.D.A.M., the medical encyclopedia contractor. If they can be corrected, everyone who carries their product (a lot of hospitals and clinics, insurers, etc.) would have better information.
     
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  3. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    This is another place where it's killing us not to have a medical specialty.
     
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  4. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    I worry when definitions begin by telling the reader what the word does not represent.

    Also, fatigue = lack of motivation? An instant tie between a physical symptom and a character flaw? So, apathy is related to fatigue, but not part of its definition, while lack of motivation is considered an essential component.

    This is a different fatigue then, than say metal fatigue. I'm not sure what role lack of motivation plays there.

    I seem to have missed the part that equates fatigue with exertion intolerance.
     
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  5. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Note on References: no dates/editions are named. And the Goldman’s Cecil Medicine books seem to be owned by Elsevier.

    See also, for example, from "thegodofpleasure" (15 March 2015): "...I can recommend following Prof. Coyne - @CoyneoftheRealm - on Twitter, where he is currently engaged in an ongoing (heated?) dialogue with Editors at Elsevier Publishing related to censorship and the gagging of alternative viewpoints..." (@thegodofpleasure)

    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...name-real-treatments.36194/page-4#post-572977

    Seems too that some other problem texts are published by Elsevier. (Sorry not able to search and cite them at this time.)
     
  6. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Re mental fatigue: People who've experienced a stroke or traumatic brain injury experience fatigue too. These patients often do a lot of rehab, right? That is not "lack of motivation".

    Also, after looking again at the list of illnesses, I noticed:
    Yet info that "CFS" often begins after an infection is not included.
     
  7. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    FWIW - the page has different dates about updating.
    Update Date 4/21/2013 <-- seems to refer to the most recent update by A.D.A.M.

    Page last updated: 24 April 2015
    <--- seems to refer to the most recent NIH update (though I have no idea what was changed)
     
  8. Jammy88

    Jammy88 Senior Member

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    well at least that's better than it was 10 yrs ago. Maybe in 2030 we'll be happier about the way our condition is considered - and, hopefully, treated.

    Best
     

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