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Niacin queries

Discussion in 'Sleep' started by Hilary, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. Hilary

    Hilary Senior Member

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    I'm looking around for supplements which will help with sleep and have been looking at niacin. From what I've read so far, two queries come to mind:

    1 I've found several references to caution with niacin if you have gallbladder disease and I have gallstones. Anyone understand the reason for the caution? I understand it's related to cholesterol but that's as far as I've got....

    2 The flushing effect I believe is caused by dilation of blood vessels and I wonder if I should therefore avoid as I get migraines? Anyone found niacin caused headache/migraine?
     
  2. helen1

    helen1 Senior Member

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    If you want help with sleep, the niacinamide form of niacin would likely be more helpful. It has a relaxing effect due to stimulating GABA receptors, does not cause you to flush, and has antiinflammatory properties.

    @Hilary
     
  3. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member

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    I can't respond to your question about Niacin as I stopped taking it because of the flushing, however, I am wondering if you have tried using magnesium supplements for sleep? I found that I went to sleep much quicker and slept much better while using the magnesium. The only problem for me was that it caused me to sleep around the clock so I had to stop using it. But I know that a lot of people do really well with magnesium for sleep issues at night.
     
  4. Hilary

    Hilary Senior Member

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    Thanks @helen1 - that sounds a good idea. Really don't want to aggravate the migraines which are so disabling already..

    @TigerLilea - yes I do take magnesium, usually 600mg. I have a strong suspicion though, that my absorption is very poor so I'm not sure how effective this is. I've just started seeing a new doctor so will talk to him about magnesium by some other means.. I do wonder just how much of what I spend on supplements is really money down the proverbial because my digestion is screwed up..

    Thanks for replying:)
     
  5. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

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    If you check the link in my signature you'll find a lot of information about what I've found useful for sleep. Niacin left me feeling very sluggish in the mornings so I don't use it.
     
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  6. rodgergrummidge

    rodgergrummidge Senior Member

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    Dietary sources of Niacin: Both nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) and tryptophan in the diet are major sources of niacin (Vit B3). Tryptophan is an amino acid which constitutes roughly 1% of proteins (depending on their source) and so Niacin deficiency is rare.

    Niacin and CFS: Niacin deficiency would lead to some of the symptoms of CFS as well as some known biochemical disruptions associated with CFS. For example, mitochondrial toxins can lead to Niacin deficiency which can be measured as increased Niacin urinary excretion. Niacin is the precursor of NAD/NADP which are involved in reactions pertaining to mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and lipid beta-oxidation. Additionally, Niacin has been shown to have anti-oxidant properties which may help with some CFS symptoms.

    Niacin supplementation and potential toxicities: Finally, to your question @Hilary! High intakes of niacin may pose a risk. Niacin provided at pharmacological doses requires high levels of methyl groups for catabolism. This can reduce the Sadenosylmethionine (SAM) pool and increase homocysteine levels in the plasma (Chemico-Biological Interactions 163 (2006) 94–112). High homocysteine is associated with increased cholesterol and/or LDLs (which theoretically may contribute to gall stones) and cardiovacular disease. High niacin intake can also result in niacin-induced insulin resistance (Chemico-Biological Interactions 163 (2006) 94–112). I guess if you were taking Niacin supplements, it would be a good idea to regularly test blood homocysteine and insulin function.

    Rodger
     
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  7. Hilary

    Hilary Senior Member

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    Thanks @rodgergrummidge - lots of information there. There is some evidence that, despite the shed loads of supplements I take and plenty of protein, I'm not absorbing stuff. I think I'll start with low dose (50mg), see how I go and get bloods checked.
     
  8. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    I flushed the first 2 times I took Niacin, but then it stopped with continued use.
     
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