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new XMRV review published

Discussion in 'XMRV Research and Replication Studies' started by Sam Carter, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Sam Carter

    Sam Carter Guest

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    from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20717743

    Immunol Res. 2010 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

    Biology and pathophysiology of the new human retrovirus XMRV and its association with human disease.

    Rusmevichientong A, Chow SA.

    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Molecular Biology Institute, 650 Charles E. Young Dr, CHS 23-133, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

    Abstract

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a new human retrovirus originally identified in prostate cancer patients with a deficiency in the antiviral enzyme RNase L. XMRV has been detected with varying frequencies in cases of prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), as well as in a small proportion of healthy individuals. An etiologic link between XMRV infection and human disease, however, has yet to be established. Here, we summarize existing knowledge regarding the characteristics of XMRV replication, association of XMRV with prostate cancer and CFS, and potential mechanisms of XMRV pathophysiology. We also highlight several areas, such as the establishment of standardized assays and the development of animal models, as future directions to advance our current understanding of XMRV and its relevance to human disease.
     
  2. leelaplay

    leelaplay member

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  3. George

    George waitin' fer rabbits

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    It looks like all of the papers that have been held up are finaly being allowed to be published. Thank God!
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

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    Given that these include papers that were finished in February, and they are all now being released in a cluster, that does seem to suggest they were held back pending whatever political factors were holding up the Alter study - the obvious candidate being the ability to say or do something meaningful about the blood supply. That's how it seems to me anyway, but is it normal for people to hold onto their results for months and publish at a time when they will have more impact? I guess any one of these other papers would be pretty minor news at another time, whereas publishing close to Alter's publication would increase the recognition. Something like that?
     

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