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New Scientist: Metabolic switch may bring on chronic fatigue syndrome

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by AndyPR, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. AndyPR

    AndyPR I'm a DAD, I Donate, Advocate and Demonstrate

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    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2121162-metabolic-switch-may-bring-on-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

    Mentions Fluge, Armstrong and Rituximab and ends with
    so an almost perfect ending, I'd imagine what Chris said and how it has been printed is somewhat different there.

    ETA: Also on post on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/newscientist/posts/10155138898239589
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
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  2. AndyPR

    AndyPR I'm a DAD, I Donate, Advocate and Demonstrate

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    MEMum likes this.
  3. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Is this illness some form of diabetes?

    Edit: I'm probably misusing the word, is diabetes a term for a metabolic disease revolving around blood sugar regulation?
     
  4. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Diabetes (mellitus) specifically requires hyperglycemia to be present for diagnosis. Most ME patients don't have diabetes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
  5. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Looking it up, diabetes seems to refer to "any of various disorders, esp diabetes mellitus, characterized by excretion of an abnormally large amount of urine".
     
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  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Yes, I was thinking of Diabetes Mellitus specifically :p
     
  7. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    This link brings up an older article where Wessely embarasses himself with psychobabble in an article titled "Mind over matter?". A shame that it's only partially readable as nonsubscriber because I wouldn't mind having a good laugh.
     
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  8. Tyto alba

    Tyto alba

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    sarah darwins and A.B. like this.
  9. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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  10. adreno

    adreno Learned helplessness

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    Quite embarrassing, yes.
     
  11. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member

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    Dr. Teitelbaum claims to be a CFS/ME expert, however, I don't think he knows the difference between chronic fatigue, the symptom, and "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" which is a diagnosis.
     
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  12. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Interesting - I look forward to seeing if this turns up in the print version on Thursday.

    For all that there's the odd bit of "there might yet be a psychological component" (which seems obligatory in the UK), this is a very long way off the model of our disease that the BPS crowd has been pushing so aggressively, and is very much against the model put forward in PACE.

    Given that there was an editorial only a few days ago in the New Scientist mentioning unfavourably the lack of open data in PACE, I hope this marks a new approach to ME/CFS by the New Scientist and demonstrates that someone has got through to them about the realities of the situation.
     
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  13. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Great article!
     
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  14. Grigor

    Grigor Senior Member

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    I interpreted that more as that psychological issues can influence your illness in a bad way. Which seems totally normal???
    Did have to read it a few times though
     
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  15. mirshine

    mirshine Senior Member

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    Me too
     
  16. Belbyr

    Belbyr

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    Is this why magnesium salt baths feel good? ;)

    I sure wish researchers could find something to help us out a little in the next year. Sounds like they are at least aiming in the right direction these past couple years...
     
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  17. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    That sort of thing isn't said about cancer, for example, in the New Scientist.
     
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  18. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    Good article, shame about the last sentence.
     
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  19. Grigor

    Grigor Senior Member

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    Very true. Could've left it out. But oh well. Baby steps
     
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  20. Woolie

    Woolie Annie Gsampel too

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    As @Sasha says, this line is only ever used by people who believe the illness they're discussing is largely psychological. Its a fudge used by the psychobabblers to reclaim an illness as psychological, even in the face of some evidence of a biological basis. If anyone questions it, they can back peddle by saying "well, every illness has a psychological component'

    If that's true, then its meaningless to say it at all.

    The clue here about its purpose is that the statement is almost never said about "physical" illnesses (as Sasha says). Do you ever hear people say "there might be a psychological component" to HIV? Cancer? Brain injury? Multiple burns? No.

    I actually think its not necessarily true that every illness has a psychological component. Every illness may cause a psychological reaction - but that's not what they're claiming, is it? The statement implies people can make their illness worse by feeling down or anxious, and better by having a positive attitude. I think we might find that's not the case for most illnesses (other than perhaps mental illnesses). Otherwise, you could get better just improving your attitude. And that doesn't really happen for many illnesses.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
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