New Atmosphere, New Vision: Gibson and Whittemore Kick Off Invest in ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry reports on Dr. Gibson's introduction and Dr. Whittemore's keynote speech, at the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

New Research Shows “Leaky Gut Syndrome” Is Real

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes:
    949
    Who could have guessed that. What really concerns me however is the fact, that there are still great hurdles in this field. As soon as scientists look at intestinal permeability or leaky gut they are very likely to get labeled as quacks. It seems the whole medical field, including doctors and many patients, seem to prefer taking pills and sticking to dogma, rather than to treat causes. If you want to know a reason, why our health care systems spiral out of control, here is one.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...eal-may-be-the-cause-of-several-diseases.html

    "
    ...
    The thing is that autoimmune diseases—like diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis—are on the rise. It’s not an exaggeration to say they comprise most of the people who seek medical care. Maybe that’s why all the alternative practitioners are talking about leaky gut. But you don’t have to dig too far in PubMed to find some serious establishment researchers talking about it, too. In fact, a German researcher wrote a recent review that makes a good case that gut health should be our main objective in medicine.

    So why isn’t it?

    Admittedly, part of the problem is the name. “Leaky gut” has a deeply unserious ring to it.
    Dr. Fasano also believes there’s another reason the medical establishment remains skeptical about leaky gut. “Some alternative medicine practitioners have made claims that are simply ridiculous,” he offered. When I asked what he meant by ridiculous, he was clear: “That all diseases of human kind are due to leaky gut.”

    “Leaky gut” may not be the unified field theory of medicine, but so far the evidence is good that its effects go way beyond the intestine. And that’s not a novel idea. As far back as the 1860s “auto-intoxication” by nasty gut microbes was thought to cause systemic disease and mental illness—and for decades well-respected scientists agreed. This idea fell out of favor in the last century—and was looked on with scorn as “unscientific.” These days when patients suggest leaky gut, doctors usually dismiss them with a hand wave and some partially informed statement about a lack of evidence.

    But that’s a deeply unscientific stance. Evidence does not only come in the form of pharmaceutically-funded drug trials; it also comes from basic science and through careful observation. And those observations should not be dismissed because they do not conform to our current medical dogma. We are simply missing too many opportunities to help people get well.

    Consider the asthma epidemic. Public health officials point to pollution in the air, never pointing out the pollution in the gut. Yet, Dr. Fasano’s group has found preliminarily that 40% of asthmatics have leaky gut22. Asthma is a problem in the inner cities—could it be related to the fact that they are also “food deserts?” Could the emulsifiers and other chemicals in the processed foods be causing leaky gut? And could that be causing asthma? Unfortunately, these are the kinds of questions we stopped asking in medicine—and most of us are impugned as quacks for even inquiring.

    On the other hand, the fact that 7 out of 10 Americans are now taking prescription drugs should not be taken lightly. If much of our disease burden is caused by leaky gut, prescription medicines can’t do anything to get to the root of the problem. This goes a long way to explain why having access to primary care does not improve outcomes.This situation is a disaster for both our economy and our health: pills and procedures are costly, but simple, inexpensivedietary changes can frequently fix a leaky gut."
     
    Hip, aimossy and xchocoholic like this.
  2. Jon_Tradicionali

    Jon_Tradicionali Alone & Wandering

    Messages:
    290
    Likes:
    322
    Zogor-Ndreaj, Shkodër, Albania
    Call me crazy, but did you not post this this same exact thread a couple of days ago?
     
  3. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes:
    949
    Maybe someone else did.
     
  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,387
    Likes:
    34,665
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    One of the issues is that leaky gut has become synonymous to many as bacteria traveling from the gut to the bloodstream in large numbers. Since that would be quickly lethal, the argument is typically dismissed. However transfer of peptide fragments can be increased, as can other chemicals including probably bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Looking at leaky gut as primarily a chemical assault changes the way it has to be reasoned about.

    I hope to read the review on the weekend. If I manage to do that I will comment further.

    There have been repeated findings of elevated LPS in the serum of ME and CFS patients. Associated biochemicals are also elevated. There are two choices left for doctors when faced with this, unless they decide to play Ostrich, and that is to look for occult bacterial infections that are undiagnosed, or accept it comes from the gut. There is no third choice that is reasonable or scientific. Sadly too many are unreasonable or unscientific.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2014
    AbbyDear and Sidereal like this.
  5. Overstressed

    Overstressed Senior Member

    Messages:
    406
    Likes:
    139
    Belgium
    I don't know why 'connective tissue disease' is commonly accepted, whereas the 'fact' that intestines, and the submucosa more specifically, consist of connective tissue, is ignored by the same people.

    A valid question would be: do these problems with connective tissue arise as a consequence or a cause of the disease?

    For me it seems quite logical that there are problems with our intestines, and since 80% of our immune systems lives there, substantially more attention must be paid over there.

    OS.
     
    AbbyDear and Waverunner like this.
  6. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes:
    4,558
    When I used the term "the wilder reaches of medicine", in describing fecal transplants, a rather conventional internist I know corrected me. This is now understood to be conventional medicine, despite the "yuck factor".

    I pointed out that among the materia medica found in ancient Egyptian tombs are pills made from compressed goose feces.
     
    NK17 likes this.
  7. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,095
    Likes:
    13,860
    This is an example of how alternative medicine practitioners may inadvertently thwart the scientific development of a field, as a result of their imprecise claims and nebulous thinking.

    This is a shame, because whereas the alternative medicine idea that "all diseases are due to leaky gut" is complete nonsense, nevertheless, leaky gut would appear to play a significant role in a certain set of diseases, including some cases of ME/CFS.


    By the way, here is a list of supplements that have been proven by published studies to reduce leaky gut.
     
    Valentijn and Waverunner like this.
  8. Jon_Tradicionali

    Jon_Tradicionali Alone & Wandering

    Messages:
    290
    Likes:
    322
    Zogor-Ndreaj, Shkodër, Albania
    Friday, 04 April 2014

    [​IMG]
    ‘CROWD’ OF ME SUFFERERS RAISES £100K FOR KEY RESEARCH
    Patients living with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) have raised £100k for new research into the misunderstood condition to take place at the University of East Anglia and The Institute of Food Research.

    The money will fund three years of ground breaking research into ‘leaky gut syndrome’ – where the immune system is thought to react to germs and toxins that enter the bloodstream because of a porous or ‘leaky’ bowel – believed to be a possible cause of a number of conditions.

    Affecting an estimated 250,000 people in Britain, ME – or chronic fatigue syndrome - causes persistent exhaustion which affects everyday life and doesn't go away with sleep or rest.

    However the cause of ME is still unknown and there is a lack of dedicated services for those with the condition.

    The partnership between UEA, IFR and Invest in ME has been established with the aim of making strides in understanding and treating ME.

    Daniel Vipond, a former undergraduate student at UEA, won the three-year scholarship.

    Based at the Institute of Food Research on the Norwich Research Park and working under the supervision of Prof Tom Wileman at UEA and Prof Simon Carding at IFR, Daniel will investigate the possible causes of ME and also lay the foundations for further research into how to treat the condition.

    He said: “Gut health is currently a popular area of research but as yet no research has been done in to how it might cause ME.

    “There is existing evidence suggesting that leaky gut syndrome is a very likely influence and if my research can show a significant proportion of ME patients do have this condition, it will pave the way for further research and even potential treatments.”

    As a collaboration between UEA, IFR and the Norwich Research Park, the project will benefit from the wealth of expertise and facilities available at the world-leading cluster of organisations which also includes The Genome Analysis Centre, John Innes Centre and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

    Richard Simpson from Invest in ME said the project was a first for the charity: “This research is absolutely essential as ME causes significant suffering for so many people.

    “It is a world-leading project and the research team across the Norwich Research Park has the facilities available to help resolve this disease, or at least begin to contribute to the understanding.”

    http://www.businessweekly.co.uk/aca...of-me-sufferers-raises-p100k-for-key-research
     
    Valentijn, Hip and Waverunner like this.
  9. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,095
    Likes:
    13,860
    Interesting.

    Michael Maes et al have published a couple of papers in this area:

    Normalization of the increased translocation of endotoxin from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) is accompanied by a remission of CFS

    Normalization of leaky gut in CFS is accompanied by a clinical improvement: effects of age, duration of illness and the translocation of LPS from gram-negative bacteria
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page