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New research on selenium

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Johnmac, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. Johnmac

    Johnmac Senior Member

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    Greg from B12Oils has new data on selenium, which could interest anyone who uses it, or anyone who uses B12 - for which Se is an essential co-factor.

    I asked him if he would mind if I pasted what he emailed me here, & he said no. So here it is:


    It is not so much what you eat, but where it was grown that may be important. Thus, Australia, NZ, and UK have been exporting soil selenium for years now, and so much of the produce, and probably worse if it is "free-range", can be deficient in selenium. Thus, in the UK selenium intake in the population is only half the RDA, in NZ it is only one quarter. Data in Australia is varied.

    You need about 6 eggs, 1 lb of chicken, or lots of lamb to get your RDA. Tuna, ham and shrimp are better sources (and that is in the US where selenium levels are high).

    RDA is about 55 ug. Fish has 12-60/100 gm, meats 5-40, and eggs 9-40 per 100 g, in Australia, but it would be regional, and depend upon whether they are battery fed or free range (battery fed would likely have more). This was in 2002, so I would guess less now. I would switch [from lamb] to pork.

    And in a second email:

    Yes the selenium problem. This appears to be really bad in countries such as NZ, Britain, Ireland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, and many northern and eastern European countries. Curiously not around the Mediterranean (as far as I can tell). It would be a hoot if the so-called benefits of the Mediterranean diet were actually due to much higher selenium in their food. If you want to post it on PR, and mention that it was in discussions with me that is fine. If we can wipe out CFS/FM, then you and I will have done something useful for society. Only diabetes, AD, ASD, PD to work on next, all of which seem relatively simple.

    I find the selenium story fascinating because it would potentially represent one of the most powerful single nutrient deficiencies that there is, arguably as important as B12, but also it has a huge role to play in B12 cycling through its activity in making functional B2. FYI there is only about 40 years of selenium left to be mined in the world (according to a paper I found). Won't that be interesting.

    The level of selenium intake in the UK appears to be halving every 10 years, so it is a big problem. Se deficiency would also cause globesity, as too B2, iodine, or even molybdenum deficiency. Similarly they would all cause an increase in the rates of dementia. Unfortunately AD Australia seems completely oblivious to the fact. Similarly increase the rates of ASD.

    Se deficiency doesn't appear to much of a problem in the US where intake is way above the normal, which is why selenium supplementation studies haven't worked in the US, but yet have in the UK. For some reason the Cochrane reviews don't appear to take this into account.

    BTW in the past Greg has emphasised that brazil nuts don't, after all, contain the right type of Se - so are no use as sources of Se.

    Needless to say I can't answer questions on the above, as I'm just passing on someone else's research.
     
    PatJ, echobravo, Theodore and 2 others like this.
  2. Hutan

    Hutan Senior Member

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    :eek: (having just eaten my daily two brazil nuts...)

    Does anyone have any more information on that?

    This study from New Zealand's University of Otago suggests that the selenium from brazil nuts is showing up in the blood.

    The literature does warn repeatedly that there is a sweet spot for selenium levels - too much or too little are both bad.

    http://www.otago.ac.nz/news/news/otago082203.html
    Selenium is obviously not the silver bullet - people in the US generally have high levels of selenium and they still get ME.
     
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Selenium is also one of those things many of us have tried. Some respond well, but I never heard of remission from it. Others don't respond at all. I think its part of an answer, but nothing like complete.
     
    Hutan likes this.
  4. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    I've come across that claim from Greg before and couldn't find any basis for it. Here, here and here are relevant posts.
     
    Hutan likes this.
  5. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    Rice is often high in selenium because of where it's grown. I used BlueBonnet Multi-minerals with Boron, which has about 146% of the RDA and my selenium tested too high - out of range. And I wasn't eating rice. Selenium causes birth defects (particularly in frogs in the rice paddies in California), so I'm wary of too much.
     
    Theodore likes this.
  6. Johnmac

    Johnmac Senior Member

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    From an earlier email from Greg:

    One thing new on the brazil nuts. On further investigation brazil nuts actually have selenomethionine, not selenocysteine, so they may not be the best source of selenium. I have stopped taking them now. Kind of annoying as they are put up as foods with selenium in them (which they do have) but it is not the right form.

     
    Hutan likes this.
  7. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    That is the statement we would like more information about. As I discussed above, I can find no evidence for Greg's claims about this. All the literature I have seen indicates that selenomethionine, the form in brazil nuts (and plants in general) is a good source of selenium.
     
    Johnmac and Hutan like this.

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