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New findings from Prof.Zhang on his previous persister cell study

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease and Co-Infections' started by juniemarie, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. juniemarie

    juniemarie Senior Member

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    Albuquerque
    https://www.facebook.com/norvect?fref=nfA new interesting study has just been published by

    Prof Ying Zhang and his colleagues from The Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health.

    Prof Zhang has previously done interesting research on persister cells that occur after antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease.

    In a new study published today, the research team performed RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis to determine the gene expression profile of B. burgdorferi persisters that survived antibiotic treatment. Amongst others, they analyzed the up-regulated and down-regulated genes in the amoxicillin and doxycycline treated B. burgdorferi persisters compared with drug free control.

    For doxycycline treated B. burgdorferi persisters, a total of 675 genes were differentially expressed between doxycycline tolerant persisters and drug free group, with 335 genes upregulated and 340 genes down-regulated in doxycycline treated group.

    For amoxicillin tolerant B. burgdorferi peristers, a total of 516 genes were differentially expressed compared with drug free control, with 342 genes being upregulated and 174 genes down-regulated.

    To read the whole study, go here:
    http://www.nature.com/emi/journal/v4/n8/full/emi201551a.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2015
  2. Battery Muncher

    Battery Muncher Senior Member

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    Looks interesting!
     

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