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New Dr Kerr Gene Expression study published

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Min, Dec 4, 2009.

  1. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Useful link.

    There was a lot happening in Ireland at this stage so I wasn't following research esp. US research as closely as I am now but I think few people at that stage were aware that the CDC had changed how they defined CFS for the study. The paper had only come out December 2005 and it isn't exactly that exciting.

    I think a lot of people didn't really know about the change until the CDC released the new prevalence figures for CFS (2.54% up from 0.235% in their previous study) around June 2007.
     
  3. Smulan

    Smulan

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    So If I got this right the CFS prevelance increased by factor 10! after CDC redefined criteria.

    "Critics have charged that it was irresponsible of the CDC to announce changes to the way CFS is handled clinically after limiting their study to genes that involve the way the brain handles stress response."

    "In a 2003 study, CDC researchers maintained that the average weekly workload of its CFS research subjects in Wichita was 48 hours per week."

    Its the same brilliant logic as trying to understand the patogenis behind chickenpox by including measles and acne in the same cohort. Spots as spots
    we say here at ...
     
  4. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Yes, based on the first CDC study (0.235%), the prevalence was 400,000 adults and you can see that figure mentioned. After the Georgia study, the prevalence was given as 4 million adults.

    A lot of people may think that the figure only jumped from 1 million to "at least" 4 million.

    That's because there was another study by Jason that found a prevalence of 0.422%. That gives a prevalence of approximately 1 million if you say that some children and people older than 60 have it also.

    However if you compare one CDC study with another it's 0.235% to 2.54%.

    I think it's best to do that as the CDC do weird exclusions for their studies:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC419502/pdf/1471-2377-4-6.pdf

    -----

    I believe many clinicians would find it strange to exclude people from the
    diagnosis of CFS if they have an abnormal Romberg test - I have heard
    clinicians say they use it to help confirm the diagnosis! Other exclusions
    seem questionable e.g. hypertension.

    This relates more to SNPs i.e. "inherited" genes. Gene expression isn't just about inherited abnormalities and they covered a wider area of gene expression.

    That wasn't the empiric definition sample as I recall. It shows that when one does a population study, one can pick up a lot of mild people. Also because of their exclusions, it looks like they may tend to exclude a lot of the more severe and severe-moderate patients.

    Yes
     
  5. parvofighter

    parvofighter Senior Member

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    Garbage in, garbage out @ CDC

    Great info tomk.... and no wonder this CDC research is so thin when they have been excluding clinical symptoms that are well known (to any rational, objective researcher) to be part of the ME/CFS spectrum. I hadn't heard of Rhomberg, altho I'd wondered about abnormal proprioception - my banging occasionally into walls, etc. Another example of this insanity is Kerr's 9th Clinical Parameter for ME/CFS in Table 1 of his 2009 gene expression paper: "Gastrointestinal Problems".

     
  6. fresh_eyes

    fresh_eyes happy to be here

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    mountains of north carolina
    We're creating some great new words on these forums. "I had a (dis)appointment with my doctor on Monday, but all I got was an ignarrogant dia-guess." :D
     
  7. gracenote

    gracenote All shall be well . . .

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    inflammatory bowel disease

    I agree with your frustration, parvofighter, but disagree with this point. To the best of my knowledge, any one with inflammatory bowel disease would be diagnosed with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, so by definition they would have those diseases. Since CFS is a diagnosis of exclusion, they would be excluded. Maybe it's possible to have one of those diseases AND CFS but it would not be useful to include them in research.

    Found in a web grab:
     
  8. parvofighter

    parvofighter Senior Member

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    You're right!

    My bad Gracenote. I meant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thanks for clarifying. Grinning sheepishly:eek:
     
  9. CBS

    CBS Senior Member

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    Levi - Thanks for the link

    Levi,

    Thank you for the link to the article on the recent HIV finding. I know this is preliminary but this seems like yet another reason for optimism amongst CFS patients, someday maybe even leading to a cure and not just a treatment.

    Shane
     

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