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Neurocognitive complaints and functional status among patients with CFS and fibromyalgia

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Bob, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    Neurocognitive complaints and functional status among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia
    Karen B. Schmaling, Karran L. Betterton
    15 Oct 2015
    Quality of Life Research
    DOI: 10.1007/s11136-015-1160-y
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11136-015-1160-y






     
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  2. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    "...and improve more slowly over time..."

    Ok, ignoring the "over time" thing, this implies we are all going to improve, just at different rates. Yes?

    They do opine "This study adds to the literature...". They at least got that right.
     
  3. Bob

    Bob

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    I think that's what they mean, but they are referring to average outcomes in their study. i.e. on average, the patients (that they studied) improved over time. And "over time" seems to be an 18 month period for this study, if I've interpreted the abstract correctly.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2015
  4. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Sorry, @Bob , I disagree. Please refer to the second sentence under "Conclusions." It reads, "The results suggest...etc." They are extrapolating from this particular study's results, hence the word "suggest."
     
  5. Chrisb

    Chrisb Senior Member

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    My interpretation, for what it is worth, is that the results section has nothing to say about improvements except in respect of bodily pain in patients with CFS. Whatever the conclusions are based on it is not on the information presented in the abstract. If they discovered anything they are not keen on sharing it. Or just lack the presentational skills necessary for the job.
     
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  6. Bob

    Bob

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    Yes, I agree that they are extrapolating the results. I think I misunderstood your question.
     
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  7. Bob

    Bob

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    The abstract isn't helpful. It's written badly and doesn't provide much info.
     
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  8. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    @Bob, I wrote my point poorly.

    Neurocognitive deficits is an appropriate subject; I seem to have dwindling anticipation when it comes to writing - I can't see what my readers will see. One casualty would be segues. I also struggle with prepositions and spelling and word choice and...
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2015
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  9. Bob

    Bob

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    @duncan, i know exactly what you mean. I'm forever editing my posts so that they convey what i actually meant, and make sense to other people!
     
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  10. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I don't have an autocorrect feature in my brain, I have an autogarble feature. I have to be careful and sometimes rewrite or edit some of my posts.
     
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  11. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    I wonder about brain damage. Like many others I look to inflammation, but I wonder about demonstrable damage. I know MRIs aren't the best vehicles to uncover the damage. SPECT scans are really frowned upon these days, at least in the US. I was scheduled for two SPECTS, but at the last minute was denied them.

    Which leaves PET scans. So expensive and hard to justify. I had one done for a study, but was refused access to the results (it was deemed solely for research and study participants were excluded from the results.)
     
  12. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Structural MRI (the standard type you get in doctors' referrals) is probably the best way to reveal actual damage. They're pretty high resolution these days. The other things you mention all focus on function, not structural damage. These functional measures are hard to interpret, because any changes in function could be a cause of ME, or they could be a consequence of it.

    In fact, fMRI results have been used int he past to support a psychosomatic view of the disorder (they look for overactivity in any area thought to be involved in any way with emotion - and hey, presto! you have your evidence!).
     

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