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Neuro-Linguistic Programming study finds NLP claims unfounded

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Glynis Steele, Jul 12, 2012.

  1. Glynis Steele

    Glynis Steele Senior Member

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    Newcastle upon Tyne UK
    I have started this thread because I think that The Lightning Process is based on NLP (?) and thought some here might find it of interest.

    (Edit: Apologies for the title, head not working well today, knee pain after physio - you'd think by now I'd know how to walk properly, but apparently not!)

    ScienceDaily (July 11, 2012) — Widely held beliefs about Neuro-Linguistic Programming and lying are unfounded.

    Proponents of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) have long claimed that it is possible to tell whether a person is lying from their eye movements. Research published July 11 in the journal PLoS ONE reveals that this claim is unfounded, with the authors calling on the public and organisations to abandon this approach to lie detection.

    For decades many NLP practitioners have claimed that when a person looks up to their right they are likely to be lying, whilst a glance up to their left is indicative of telling the truth.
    Professor Richard Wiseman (University of Hertfordshire, UK) and Dr Caroline Watt (University of Edinburgh, UK) tested this idea by filming volunteers as they either lied or told the truth, and then carefully coded their eye movements. In a second study another group of participants was asked to watch the films and attempt to detect the lies on the basis of the volunteers' eye movements.
    "The results of the first study revealed no relationship between lying and eye movements, and the second showed that telling people about the claims made by NLP practitioners did not improve their lie detection skills,” noted Wiseman.

    Full article:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120711205943.htm
    Hanna likes this.

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