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Neuro-inflammation, blood-brain barrier, seizures and autism

Discussion in 'Mast Cell Disorders/Mastocytosis' started by nanonug, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    Virginia, USA
    Full article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293070/pdf/1742-2094-8-168.pdf

    Abstract
    Many children with Autism Spectrum Diseases (ASD) present with seizure activity, but the pathogenesis is not understood. Recent evidence indicates that neuro-inflammation could contribute to seizures. We hypothesize that brain mast cell activation due to allergic, environmental and/or stress triggers could lead to focal disruption of the blood-brain barrier and neuro-inflammation, thus contributing to the development of seizures. Treating neuro-inflammation may be useful when anti-seizure medications are ineffective.
     
  2. Glynis Steele

    Glynis Steele Senior Member

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    Newcastle upon Tyne UK
    Patients with seizure's sometimes use the ketogenic diet to control their seizure activity. Here is a study applying this diet to autistic kids. I myself know beyond doubt that in my daughter's case, carb's cause the autistic trait's. Whether this is down to the carb's themselves, or as a result of carb fermentation by gut bacteria, or some other toxin produced by the bacteria, who knows.

    Application of a ketogenic diet in children with autistic behavior: pilot study.
    Evangeliou A, Vlachonikolis I, Mihailidou H, Spilioti M, Skarpalezou A, Makaronas N, Prokopiou A, Christodoulou P, Liapi-Adamidou G, Helidonis E, Sbyrakis S, Smeitink J.
    Source

    Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, University of Crete, Crete, Greece. evangeli@med.uoc.gr
    Abstract

    A pilot prospective follow-up study of the role of the ketogenic diet was carried out on 30 children, aged between 4 and 10 years, with autistic behavior. The diet was applied for 6 months, with continuous administration for 4 weeks, interrupted by 2-week diet-free intervals. Seven patients could not tolerate the diet, whereas five other patients adhered to the diet for 1 to 2 months and then discontinued it. Of the remaining group who adhered to the diet, 18 of 30 children (60%), improvement was recorded in several parameters and in accordance with the Childhood Autism Rating Scale. Significant improvement (> 12 units of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale) was recorded in two patients (pre-Scale: 35.00 +/- 1.41[mean +/- SD]), average improvement (> 8-12 units) in eight patients (pre-Scale: 41.88 +/- 3.14[mean +/- SD]), and minor improvement (2-8 units) in eight patients (pre-Scale: 45.25 +/- 2.76 [mean +/- SD]). Although these data are very preliminary, there is some evidence that the ketogenic diet may be used in autistic behavior as an additional or alternative therapy.
     

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