Invisible Illness Awareness Week 2016: Our Voices Need to Be Heard
Never heard of Invisible Illness Awareness Week? You're not alone. Jody Smith sheds a little light to make it more visible
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Nature paper: Shocking new role found for the immune system

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by natasa778, Jul 13, 2016.

  1. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,453
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160713143156.htm
     
    Dufresne, actup, TigerLilea and 20 others like this.
  2. roller

    roller wiggle jiggle

    Messages:
    451
    Likes:
    214
    no.

    our behavioural headquarter are the 'hunger hormones', the wording is misleading - sorry.

    its neuropeptite y(y)
    the ghrelin
    the leptin
    and all the others directly related.

    they control/direct our behaviour.

    and bottom line: bugs run the show anyways. not interferon gamma.

    pls wake up, finally.
     
  3. Dichotohmy

    Dichotohmy

    Messages:
    28
    Likes:
    53
    North State, CA
    Very, very interesting article. Its fascinating how cytokine activity can be both good and bad. Such as in promoting deep sleep and normal tissue recovery from exercise as good versus creating malaise or autoimmunity as bad. I have also long felt I have no choice or control over my desire for socialization, and this inf-gamna finding makes perfect sense. I would also wager that we have much less control than we think, over all facets of life and so-called decisions, due to hidden involuntary physiologic processes similar to what the article discusses.


    But how, as the article mentions, but doesn't explain, is normal inf-gamma activity restored? Or are the authors just saying an artificial blocking is ceased and then normal inf-gamma activity returns? Furthermore, what does it say when the immune system doesn't produce inf-gamma? Is it failing to produce other chemokines as well? Can this be considered immune deficiency, which would make immune deficiency a spectrum disease of sorts?
     
    actup and wastwater like this.
  4. Kina

    Kina

    Messages:
    10,130
    Likes:
    17,201
    Sofa, UK
    @roller

    I think there are many possible explanations and sometimes it seems you are blinded by one thing --answers are numerous and unless you engage in the research you can only have an opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2016
  5. roller

    roller wiggle jiggle

    Messages:
    451
    Likes:
    214
    @Kina

    of course its my opinion only.
    based on experience.
    though, i feel very very sure about this.
     
  6. Paralee

    Paralee Senior Member

    Messages:
    513
    Likes:
    553
    USA
    Sorry, maybe kind of off subject but desperation gives courage...... Could roller be right about hunger hormones? I have rarely been hungry in over 5-6 years. It would be so nice to want to eat.
     
  7. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,111
    Likes:
    4,693
    Concord, NH
    I am hungry all the time!

    GG
     
    Justin30, justy and Webdog like this.
  8. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,000
    People seem shocked every time it is discovered that our personality is dictated by biology. But, where else would personality come from?

    It has been hypothesized for some time that eg 'sickness behavior' and depression are indeed behavioral responses to avoid infection and allow the immune system maximal energy to function. Nonetheless, it is intersting if we are now finding evidence to support these ideas.
     
    ahmo, Dufresne, actup and 10 others like this.
  9. frog_in_the_fog

    frog_in_the_fog Test Subject

    Messages:
    253
    Likes:
    497
    California
    It's no secret that if you feel lousy, you will not want to do anything other than rest. If you have a weak immune system, you will tend to want to avoid crowds. So to us, these findings are hardly new.
     
    panckage, PatJ, justy and 1 other person like this.
  10. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,453
    The so-called 'fever effect' is a well known phenomenon in autism, where one sees sudden and sharp improvements in social interaction and communication during periods of fever. It occurs in roughly 1/3 of affected individuals, including more severely affected. As one parent describes it, her son "visits them once or twice a year". Sometimes these improvements start a day or two before the fever kicks in. There are different theories and mechanistic explanations as to why/how this happens but imo interferon-gamma is very likely involved.
     
    ahmo, Dufresne, actup and 5 others like this.
  11. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,475
    Likes:
    2,640
    Indeed
     
  12. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,475
    Likes:
    2,640
    I have been thinking for years something is wrong with the interferon gamma system. I think it works much gbetter now but I am still waiting for a good fever.
     
    actup and wastwater like this.
  13. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes:
    10,430
    Cornwall, UK
    Proof of nothing, but a curious byroad .. this morning I came across a mention of the Victorian artist Richard Dadd. He's one of those whose work you may know, even if the name is unfamiliar. I looked up his Wiki bio and it's both sad and fascinating:

    - full article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Dadd

    The dramatic personality change could indeed have been emerging paranoid schizophrenia, as seems to be taken for granted in all the accounts I found, but you have to wonder about that boat trip on the Nile and symptoms that were taken for sunstroke. Could a parasitic or other infection be solely responsible for the personality change? Or did an infection trigger or worsen the manifestation of nascent mental illness?

    Stories like this one are not so uncommon. Seems we have an awful long way to go before we really start understanding this stuff.
     
    actup and SickOfSickness like this.
  14. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,305
    Likes:
    2,239
    US
    People may think if it's biology, then we don't have souls?
     
  15. roller

    roller wiggle jiggle

    Messages:
    451
    Likes:
    214
    ...no free will... or no much... ?
     
  16. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,475
    Likes:
    2,640
    Animals are supposed not to have souls. None the less their behaviour change when they have an infection.
     
  17. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member

    Messages:
    917
    Likes:
    621
    uk
    I didn't find it shocking.
     
  18. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,787
    Likes:
    4,570
    As a lapsed physicist I can report that individual electrons seem to have free will. At least they have strong limits on predictable behavior. I can also report that the apparent oxymoron "deterministic chaos" is still subject to considerable research. Before you get your knickers in a twist over human free will, you need to think carefully about what you mean in simpler cases.
     
    actup, Paralee and Scarecrow like this.
  19. Kina

    Kina

    Messages:
    10,130
    Likes:
    17,201
    Sofa, UK
    I am having a bit of problem with the use of the word "social" when it comes to flies, zebra fish etc. Social is defined as living or disposed to live in companionship with others or in a community, rather than in isolation. So yes many animals need each other for survival which a lot different from being 'social' -- we can live in isolation and still survive these days. So I am reading this research as the blocking of the molecule resulted in the mice isolating themselves more or being less social. It seems like a huge leap to go on to suggest that the immune molecule plays a 'profound role in maintaining proper social function' and how do you define proper social function in mice and how does this translate to humans. I would say in animals it's about survival rather than being 'social'. It's interesting research but it's really annoying when the headlines scream out 'shocking new role...' The research could lead to maybe isolating what is contributing or causing illnesses where social function is impaired.

    I personally think, we humans, have a very very long way to go in understanding the brain, immune system etc -- tip of the iceberg.

    I have a picture in my head now of a bunch of flies sitting around drinking tea :rofl:
     
    duncan likes this.
  20. JohnCB

    JohnCB Immoderate

    Messages:
    348
    Likes:
    2,531
    England
    And the term lousy derived from how you feel when you are infested with lice. Generally, in the developed world at least, it is now unusual to be infest with lice, but we still use that as an analogy for how we feel with other pathogens.
     
    actup and frog_in_the_fog like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page