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My Surgeon is pressuring me to have my thyroid removed!

Discussion in 'Hormones' started by belize44, Jan 23, 2016.

  1. belize44

    belize44 Senior Member

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    For about 15 years I have had a cyst and a nodule on my thyroid. Over the past five years, my thyroid has gotten more swollen on the left side, and now I have a goiter. In the past I have had Ultrasounds and biopsies performed; all come back negative for cancer cells. Since my mother died of thyroid cancer, I am especially concerned.

    So I just had another biopsy done, and I did not like the surgeon at all. She seemed to be giving me a hard sell to have either half or my entire thyroid removed. She swore that there wasn't any other course of action left to me, and that the goiter would only continue to grow if I didn't allow this surgery.

    My question is, does anybody know of any other alternatives to having the thyroid removed? I have been reading about people who had this problem and gotten rid of it with iodine supplements, or even thyroid medication. I am desperate for advice, because I can't quite believe that this is my only solution!

    Another thing that puzzles me is that my thyroid reading always come back normal, yet I suffer from fine tremors, thinning hair, dry skin and weight gain. I feel hypothyroid, even though the tests don't show this. Any feed back and/or advice will be appreciated!
     
  2. leela

    leela Slow But Hopeful

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    If you are just testing TSH and not free T3 and T4 then it can be difficult to get an accurate reading.

    I was just reading today on a Lyme board a post by a nurse practitioner who uses iodine with 7-Keto to restore thyroid function.
    Apparently the iodine boosts production of T4, but if you're not converting well, the 7-keto helps it convert to T3.
    This was not a discussion based on having a growth though (just low thyroid function) so I don't know if this is useful to you.

    From a natural remedy standpoint (if you're into that) Tulsi (Holy Basil) can shrink a goiter. Applying true essential oil of Boswellia (frankincense)
    topically to the thyroid can also reduce inflammation. Given your family history and the cyst/nodules, these measures may not be sufficient, though they might bring relief while you're weighing your options.

    In any case, there's no reason to get surgery from someone you don't feel comfortable with. Since it's not urgent, you have time to investigate both other options and other surgeons if need be.

    Good luck!
     
  3. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    @belize44

    It is common to have okay labs yet be hypothyroid.

    I am shrinking my goiter at the moment with frankensence oil rubbed in a circular movement onto the skin, about 2 drops. There were some nodules on it but I cant feel them any more. You need a good quality one not a cheap one, and food grade.
     
    SickOfSickness and belize44 like this.
  4. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    We cannot comment on alternatives without knowing what the reason for surgery is. If your thyroid tests are normal then presumably it is not to remove an overactive gland. The indication might be a concern of possible cancer, although it sounds as if not. A large gland can be problematic in special circumstances but a goitre in itself need not be operated on if benign and euthyroid.

    If the thyroid hormone levels are normal or not far off I think taking iodine is unlikely to shrink a goitre. Thyroid medication is for when the levels are abnormal.

    Did your surgeon explain why the thyroid needed surgery?
     
    svetoslav80 and Esther12 like this.
  5. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Hi @belize44,

    Sorry to hear about the advice you've gotten from the surgeon you encountered. Since you asked for advice, I would start out by saying emphatically that I think we would all do well to RUN away from people we don't like. Especially those who make invasive health recommendations when effective, less invasive, lower impact therapies seem more plausible to us.

    I've done a fair amount of research on iodine recently, and discovered that iodine deficiency is involved in a large variety of thyroid, breast and ovarian issues, including PCOS, and for endocrine issues of all kinds. I just posted on another thread about a doctor well-versed in iodine therapy who tests all his patients for deficiency, and discovered 96% of them are deficient, most of them severely so.

    Unfortunately, conventional medicine is mostly unaware of these kinds of deficiencies, and the therapeutic value of addressing them. I would guess most ND's would be able to give you much greater insight into your situation, and some excellent non-invasive therapies to consider. In short, I would say following the time-honored advice of getting a second opinion would be a good thing for you to do.

    All the Best, Wayne

    BTW, I recently started supplementing with iodine, and it has given my system a much greater sense of resiliency. I would encourage you to research iodine therapy in depth. The book below would be a great starting point... The author struggled with breast cancer for years, intensely researching it during this time.

    It took her eight years to run across references to iodine deficiency possibly being a factor. That's how well hidden some of the information on iodine therapy is. Supplementing with iodine was miraculous for her. And is for many others as well.

    The Iodine Crisis: What You Don't Know About Iodine Can Wreck Your Life
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
  6. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Hi @belize44 if you do not like the surgeon at all, your best bet would be to ask for a second opinion. As @Jonathan Edwards said, members of the forum do not have a clear picture of your particular situation, and nor should we be giving advice not knowing the whole story.

    Sending best wishes.
     
  7. helen1

    helen1 Senior Member

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    Mary and belize44 like this.
  8. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    The medical community has known for over 200 years about the link between goiter and iodine, making the above statement questionable at best. Here's an abstract from PubMed...

    Research on iodine deficiency and goiter in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
    Zimmermann MB1.
    Author information

    Abstract
    In 1811, Courtois noted a violet vapor arising from burning seaweed ash and Gay-Lussac subsequently identified the vapor as iodine, a new element. The Swiss physician Coindet, in 1813, hypothesized the traditional treatment of goiter with seaweed was effective because of its iodine content and successfully treated goitrous patients with iodine. Two decades later, the French chemist Boussingault, working in the Andes Mountains, was the first to advocate prophylaxis with iodine-rich salt to prevent goiter.

    The French chemist Chatin was the first to publish, in 1851, the hypothesis that iodine deficiency was the cause of goiter. In 1883, Semon suggested myxedema was due to thyroid insufficiency and the link between goiter, myxedema, and iodine was established when, in 1896, Baumann and Roos discovered iodine in the thyroid. In the first 2 decades of the 20th century, pioneering studies by Swiss and American physicians demonstrated the efficacy of iodine prophylaxis in the prevention of goiter and cretinism. Switzerland's iodized salt program has been operating uninterrupted since 1922. Today, control of the iodine deficiency disorders is an integral part of most national nutrition strategies.​
     
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  9. belize44

    belize44 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the replies! I apologize if I wasn't clear about the reason that the surgeon was pressing for surgery. The sole reason that she wanted to operate was because the goiter has gotten large enough to press uncomfortably against my esophagus and makes anything but a V-neck collar on my clothing uncomfortable. There was absolutely no sign of cancer. The goiter is barely discernable to the naked eye.And I fully intend to get a second, even a third opinion!
     
    Wayne, svetoslav80, Kina and 4 others like this.
  10. South

    South Senior Member

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    Iodine:

    The Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic , both famous clinics and very science-based, state outright:

    "Nodules develop more often in people who have a family history of nodules, and in people who don’t get enough iodine"

    "Lack of iodine in your diet can sometimes cause your thyroid gland to develop thyroid nodules."

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thyroid-nodules/basics/causes/con-20021546

    https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases_conditions/hic_Thyroid_Nodules
     
  11. caledonia

    caledonia

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    I can't believe they haven't tried thyroid medication and are instead demanding surgery.

    It has also been well known for like 100 years that a goiter is due to iodine deficiency. The thyroid enlarges in an attempt to find/absorb more iodine. Why do you think they make iodized salt?

    My suggestion would be to check out http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

    Keep looking for a good doc!
     
    Wayne and minkeygirl like this.
  12. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    As do the ovaries, according to what I've been reading.
     
  13. roller

    roller wiggle jiggle

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    i dont know thyroids but i feel with you.
    being hyper by 12, i had an radio-iodine treatment by 35, thinking it would solve the problems.
    it was good for a while.

    the lab said 'this has to be removed', though the Mayo-clinic doctor was not in favour about.
    i pressed to have the treatment.

    for my understanding. the thyroid tries constantly to balance. when it looks bad, then it has been struggling for long years already.
    should be best to find the cause of this.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
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  14. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

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    If you take iodine, be sure to take all the cofactors described on
    http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

    Without the other vitamins and stuff, I think you can cause harm instead of benefit.
     
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  15. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Isn't iodine deficiency rather rare in developed countries where measures such as iodized salt are used to prevent this from happening?
    I guess there might be exceptions when absorption problems might interfer with the uptake of iodine, but I'm only speculating about that.

    Do some people with health problems not absorb vitamins/minerals efficiently? I have read that eating foods containing vitamins are absorbed differenyly that a vitamin.

    As an example I am not suppose to take calcium supplements because of kidney stoned yet b foods rich in calcium are not contrdicted for "stoners" *:D
    Barb

    No I am not referring to druggies!:lol:
    ETA
    Here's a site which lists foods high in iodine as well as the iodine deficiencies by country.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
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  16. Kina

    Kina

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    Please note this thread is being closed temporarily to remove some off-topic posts.

    Thank you and sorry for the inconvenience.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
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  17. Kina

    Kina

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    Please note, we have removed numerous off-topic posts related to our 'No Medical Advice' rule.

    Please don't use threads to discuss moderation matters as it does take a thread very much off-topic.

    If you want to ask about a rule or discuss a rule, you can contact one of the moderators or start a thread in the 'Moderation' forum.

    If you believe somebody has breached a rule, please use the 'Report' button to report the issue.

    The thread has been re-opened. Any further off-topic posts will be removed.

    Thank you.
     
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  18. caledonia

    caledonia

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    One of my docs also has me eating Brazil nuts for selenium for my thyroid.

    Also I had autoimmune thyroiditis for 13 years and was taking Armour Thyroid, My TSH was normal, but my thyroid antibodies were sky high. I went to many doctors who missed it even though I had many symptoms. My good doc did a complete thyroid panel and found it.

    I said "had" autoimmune thyroiditis because it has cleared. I no longer need medication and my complete thyroid panel is normal. I believe the reason is somewhere between getting my last mercury filling out and starting methylation supplements. My thyroid got better about a year and a half after that (I did both around the same time).

    Ben Lynch also has a video on the link between MTHFR (methylfolate) and thyroid disease.


    I have a similar family history of thyroid disease - my mom had surgeries for nodules and also had thyroid cancer. She also had ME.
     
  19. belize44

    belize44 Senior Member

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    Just an update for everyone here. I had my initial visit with an endocrinologist. I was impressed with her knowledge and thoroughness, and I have been scheduled for a repeat biopsy three months down the line, since my insurance won't pay for another one so soon. Also, she is ordering blood work.

    The other thing I am struggling with, is the fact that I can't seem to legally request medical records for my mother who has passed away from thyroid cancer. My doctor wants to know what kind of thyroid cancer she had for the record. But I am running into all kinds of frustration. The hospital where she passed away is in another state, and everyone I speak to tells me that my sister has to request the medical records because her name is on the death certificate. Well, my sister is unreachable since she is part of my toxic, dysfunctional family and doesn't like to answer her telephone for months at a time. After all, she made herself unavailable when I wanted to invite her to my wedding, and at other critical moments in life. So she is definitely not a resource I can rely upon. I explained this to the woman on the phone, and all she could suggest is a court order. I find this very upsetting!

    My question is, does anyone have any input or has anyone had a similar situation arise with medical records? It seems so unfair that out of ten siblings, my sister should be given such power over me.:aghhh:
    On a brighter note, I have purchased the book Stop the Thyroid Madness!
     
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  20. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Can you get a consultation with a lawyer? I don't know what your financial situation is nor what's available in your community, but if there's legal aid available they charge you on a sliding scale. Maybe a letter from a lawyer would be more effective than contacting your sister yourself and stirring up an already strained relationship.

    I don't know if a physician is legally permitted to write a letter to your sister but I would think a letter to the court would cover any liability.

    I don't know the relationship with your sister nor am I a lawyer so my advice may not apply.

    Situations like this are stressful if well. Having this DD plus added health problems is insult after injury.

    Take extra care of yourself and hope things improve for you. Thanks for the update.

    Barb
     
    belize44 likes this.

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