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My Personal Cancer Plan - An informed Choice...

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by golden, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Thanks Brenda, been trying to join the new forum :)
  2. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Sam, in the newspaper article above has reminded me of something else.

    Healers.

    I wouldnt go to any old mediocre healer etc.

    I would seek out someone who seems to have a real gift (not necessarily with a certuficate!)

    One such person I want to mention here.

    I was rummaging through my loft maybe over a year or so ago and found a book I must have got in tge 80's or 90's and quickly discarded.

    Anyway, here is the book in front of me about Alternative Healing.

    I looked up M.E. and there were some useful suggestions.

    However I was stunned to see not a field such as Shiatsu or Acupuncture for example being promoted as being helpful for M.E. -

    But an actual person!!! A healer.

    Not only this, but I later found that she is also endorsed by Dr.Myhill!!!

    Her name is Seka Nikolic and she is still going :)

    http://www.sekanikolic.com/

    I almost tried this for M.E. but became adamant that actually yes I CAN heal myself ha ha :)
  3. baccarat

    baccarat Senior Member

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  4. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Brenda, Hi! :)

    Changing subconscious programming like this is integeral to healing an 'incurable' disease I think.

    'Oh Cancer, is that all.. glad its nothing serious'...



    I joined the forum...

    The administrator Mr.W says that the Rife must not be solely relied upon but that a major component is diet and lifestyle changes...

    But there are massive variations in advice - its worse than trying to understand the methylation cycle!

    People are saying the 'real' ones are thousands of dollars, a coil or plasma?, and a multitude of other factors...

    I had a go on the Aysra machine and I was suprised by its accuracy - but still not 100% and a few peculiarities...

    But I dont like digital homeopathy and taking dozens of remedies at once...

    The Rife machine doesnt seem to do that?

    Could you point it in my direction and tell me what it says :)
  5. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    An Update:

    I receiced no emails back from any Cancer Charities with regards to them clarifying the real statistics of the effectiveness of Chemotherapy .

    I also received nothing from the Bristol Cancer Hospital, however I discovered they came under attack and have been forcibly modified which would explain their website.

    Not impressed at all with the McMillan website explaini.g absolute versus relative risk statistics. Not pleased at all.
  6. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    The Burzynski clinic would definately be descibed as Alternative in the Uk..

    But perhaps not Natural Medicine..

    http://www.canceractive.com/cancer-active-page-link.aspx?n=2122

    This Alternative Cancer website contains info. on this treatment
  7. Hell...Hath...No...Fury..

    Hell...Hath...No...Fury.. Senior Member

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    I've been using a zapper on and off for about 8 years. These devices do help somewhat with some symptoms but not convinced about cancer. I got cancer about 2 years after zapping regularly. I've just recently gone back to using it again. My first one was a primitive home made one but I use one with a few frequencies now.
    golden likes this.
  8. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Still Understanding Absolute Versus Relative risk (mainly because I cant believe this has been happening)

    I have endured cancer charities explain it in terms of washing machine maintenance, using detergant or using bleach, smoking health risks and how much hair might I loose whilst having Chemotherapy..

    But I havent read any actually talk about it in terms of Chemotherapy!!!

    http://www.breastcancerdeadline2020...nding-research/relative-risk-vs-absolute.html

    Not familiar with this site but it echos the report on my link on absolute vs relative risk and Chemotherapy above.

    Just trying to fish out several different sources for a conclusion.
  9. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    You need something like a GB4000 for cancer. Zappers are just not powerful enough.
  10. golden

    golden Senior Member

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  11. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    Hi golden

    Although zappers are not found to be powerful enough for cancer, there are cheaper machines than the GB4000 sorry I should have said that.The one I bought recently, which is popular on the forum, was £50. Did you read anything on the forum about the cancer clinic in NZ and John White? A number of people like him are investigating treating DNA which can be done remotely. Its a bit out there for most people and I dont want to say too much about it as it is experimental atm but some success is happening.
    golden likes this.
  12. Nanou

    Nanou

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    Toronto
    Hi
    I am a chinese medicine doctor in toronto, specializing in women s problems, digestive problems, and skin.
    I also suffer from chronic fatigue ... See no one is safe!
    I m using chinese herbs to alleviate my own symptoms, such as night sweats, Herat palpitation, tinnitus, but I have not found a cure yet.
    As far as cancer goes, chinese medicine is definitely a good choice to alleviate side effects of chemo and radiation. It is no substitute for western medicine though. Herbs using to fight cancer are as toxic than western medicine. However post chemo, and post radiation, many herbs can help regulate immune function and prevent reoccurrence, also treat symptoms chemo and radiation have produced ...
  13. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Hi Brenda,

    Soooo sorry for the delay...

    I lost my internet connection.

    I have read a bit about distance RIFE. Its well within my belief system so I dont have difficulty following the theories.

    Good Stuff .... :)

    I will try and look at the names you mention.
  14. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Hi nanou,

    I am interested in learning new mindsets in order to help my symptom picture, if nothing else it keeps rhe mind flexible.

    I am finding Ayraveda very helpful.

    I dont know much about Chinese Herbs. The only time I tried them - yep I had an allergic reaction! ha ha

    I know a bit about Tibetan medicine and their herbs can have toxic things in to Westerners.

    If you read about Dr. Andrew Weil, he has a clinic in Torronto, he was a Botanist and then trained as a Medical Doctor.

    He says this gave him a rare perspective. He is skeptical of the 'active principle' found in plants and the attempts to isolate and synthesize it and make it into a pharmaceutical.

    He states that herbs can bring the body back to homeostasis eg. Adaptogens instead of forcing the physiology in one direction.

    He argues whole plant remedies are fundamentally often better.

    Here is his article called: Why herbs are (mostly) better than drugs.

    " I have always been fascinated by the difference between plants and the drugs that are isolated from them. This goes back to my student days at Harvard in the 1960s, where I received my undergraduate degree in botany, and then went on to medical school. It's rare -- too rare, I have to say -- for botanists to become doctors. The experience gave me a unique perspective on health and medicine.For four decades, I've been skeptical of a prevailing belief in Western medicine: when a plant shows bioactivity in humans, we must attribute that effect to a single, predominant compound in the plant. We label that the "active principle," isolate it, synthesize it, and make a pharmaceutical out of it. Then, typically, we forget about the plant. We don't study any of the other compounds in it or their complex interactions.This belief persists for two reasons. First, it makes research much easier. Single compounds can be manufactured in pure, standardized dosages, which simplifies clinical trials. (However, technology has largely solved this problem. Modern growing and processing methods make it possible to produce standardized, complex, whole-plant-based medicines. Clinical trials of these compounds have become quite sophisticated, especially in Europe.)Second, and this is clearly the major reason, it makes drugs far more profitable for drug companies. Isolating and synthesizing a single molecule allows a drug company to patent that molecule. Making slight chemical modifications allows further patent potential. Such exclusivity can be worth billions, whereas a whole plant offers little opportunity for profit.Expensive as it is to the consumer, this faith in "single-agent" drugs would be acceptable if they actually yielded better results. But the fact is, the natural, whole plant often has both benefits and safety that put the isolated compounds to shame.Medicinal plants contain a wide array of chemical compounds. At first, this looks like chaos, but more investigation reveals a distinct order. Natural selection pressures push a plant to "try out" variations on molecules to enhance the plant's odds of surviving stressful environments. So, often, one molecule is present in the greatest amount and has the most dramatic effect in a human body -- but along with it are variations of that molecule in the same plant.For example, for several years, I did ethnobotanical study in South America, researching native uses for coca leaf, which most of us know only as the source of the isolated, problematic, addictive drug cocaine. For Andean Indians, whole coca leaf is the number one medicinal plant. They use it to treat gastrointestinal disturbances; specifically, for both diarrhea and constipation. From the perspective of Western pharmacology, this makes no sense. Cocaine stimulates the gut, it increases bowel activity, so obviously it would be a good treatment for constipation, but what could it do for diarrhea except make it worse?However, if you look carefully at the coca leaf's molecular array, you find 14 bioactive alkaloids, with cocaine in the greatest amount. While cocaine acts as a gut stimulant, other coca alkaloids can have precisely the opposite action, they inhibit gut activity.This means that when you take the whole mixture into the body, the potential is there for the action to go in either direction. What decides it? The state of the body, which is a function of which receptors in the gut's tissues are available for binding. During my time in Andean Indian communities, I collected many reports about whole coca's paradoxical, normalizing effect on bowel function, and experienced it firsthand, as well.Herbs like coca that can "tone" the body and bring it back to homeostasis are known as adaptogens, a term coined by Soviet physician and scientist Nikolai Lazarev in 1947. Examples include schisandra, reishi mushroom, eleutherococcus and ginseng. Asian ginseng, for example, has an array of active constituents known as ginsenosides. One of them, Rg1, can stimulate the nervous system, while another, Rb1, has been found to calm it. But even this is an oversimplification. Other constituent cofactors apparently increase the adaptogenic properties of ginseng, making the therapeutic whole more than the sum of its parts. Ultimately, this non-specific response boosts resistance to stress -- whether the stress is physical exertion, infection, or some other problem.So using whole-plant remedies is a fundamentally different -- and, I would argue, often better -- way to treat illness. In Western medicine, we typically give the body no choice. We use single compounds that, essentially, shove physiology in one direction.Let me be clear -- sometimes, that is very appropriate and valuable, if the body is dramatically out of balance and must get back on track very quickly. For example, during a case of anaphylactic shock, there is no time for the body's receptors to select specific effects, so a drug such as pure epinephrine can be lifesaving.But in many cases, particularly with the chronic, degenerative diseases of modern civilization, there is time to allow the body to participate, to choose just what it needs. As it slowly heals, it can develop a new balance; a dynamic equilibrium that helps it cope with stress in the future.Human beings and plants have co-evolved for millions of years, so it makes perfect sense that our complex bodies would be adapted to absorb needed, beneficial compounds from complex plants and ignore the rest. This is an established fact in nutrition, but the West's sharp distinction between food and medicine somehow blinds us to these properties when it comes to botanicals. The most successful medical philosophies make no such division -- Okinawans, the world's longest-lived people, believe that the food they eat is "nuchi gusui" which roughly translates as "medicine for life."So I will continue in my lifelong skepticism, and persist in my belief that plants are (usually) better than pharmaceutical drugs.Andrew Weil, M.D. is the founder and director of theArizona Center for Integrative Medicine
    and is the editorial director of DrWeil.com
    . Dr. Weil invites you to join the conversation: become a fan on Facebook
    , follow him on Twitter
    and check out his Daily Health Tips Blog"
  15. golden

    golden Senior Member

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  16. golden

    golden Senior Member

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