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MS Patients Struggle with Misdiagnosis and Ineffective Treatments, Survey Finds

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Webdog, May 1, 2017.

  1. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    Much of this sounds strangely familiar. Except the "we have a lot of treatment options" part, of course.
     
    Valentijn, MastBCrazy, MEMum and 5 others like this.
  2. Mohawk1995

    Mohawk1995 Senior Member

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    @Webdog "A significant percentage of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients struggle with improper diagnoses and ineffective treatments, a national survey of more than 5,300 patients found."

    We actually wondered early on if our son had some type of atypical MS. Interesting that even though this is a much more "researched" disease with more recognizable diagnostic tests, it still shares these same issues with a much more difficult disease like ME/CFS. No wonder people with ME/CFS feel like they are misdiagnosed and ineffectively treated (which of course they often are)!
     
    MastBCrazy, MEMum and Webdog like this.
  3. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    I wondered this about myself too. And although 3 neurologists agree that I don't have MS, I still do wonder at times.
     
  4. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

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    I love how every doctor and article about MS talks about all these wonderful treatments available.

    MS drugs have been proven to reduce relapses in half of the people taking them. Not eliminate, but reduce. And half of people taking them get no benefit at all. Additionally, those drugs have incredible side effects. The injectables result in necrosis of the flesh at injection sites, which is permanent. All the drugs are toxic to the liver, so many people must take cyclical breaks from them until liver function has improved. Then there's hair loss, serious GI problems, flu-like symptoms, etc...

    With CFS, there is a complete lack of treatment and doctors pretty much shrug their shoulders. With MS, neurologists are often pretty aggresively pushing very toxic drugs that have limited benefits for most. MS may have more visibility and sympathy, but the treatment options aren't much better than doing nothing.

    I don't think that being diagnosed with MS vs. CFS is necessarily better in terms of treatment options. Maybe only for public awareness.
     

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