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Most Effective Foods That Bind With Mercury

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Wayne, Mar 18, 2014.

  1. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Insoluble fruit fibers are best at binding with mercury, according to this article. Strawberries are best; citrus fruit, apples and pears are good as well. Other foods that bind well: Hemp protein and peanut butter. Although these foods bind with mercury really well, they don't necessarily bind well with other heavy metals.

    Most Effective Foods That Bind With Mercury
    Hanna, merylg, golden and 1 other person like this.
  2. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    Fruit pectin and sodium alginate are also good.

    I cook up a bunch of pectin and eat it when I am going through a heavy metal detox, and it usually helps ease some of my symptoms.
    merylg and maryb like this.
  3. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    @Wayne
    so modified citrus pectin may be a good choice?
    minkeygirl likes this.
  4. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    @maryb That's what I mentioned above--pectin is short for "modified fruit pectin." ;)
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  5. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl Senior Member

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    Chorella too.

    @maryb, you can buy the stuff in the market used for canning.
  6. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    The best thing I've found though is NAC.
    Not a food I know, but really relieves the side effects of toxic overload.
    merylg and Tiger Lily 813 like this.
  7. Lynn_M

    Lynn_M Senior Member

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    The Natural News article that Wayne linked to found that the insoluble plant fibers bind to mercury in the testing vial. That testing did not determine if the mercury stayed bound to the insoluble plant fibers well enough to maintain the binding in the human body and then be excreted together in feces or urine. Until that can be proven, we don't know if the mercury is truly exiting the body or just being sequestered somewhere in the body once it loses its binding to the fiber.
    helen1 and Dreambirdie like this.
  8. whodathunkit

    whodathunkit Senior Member

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    Modified Citrus Pectin is good and easy to take. Doesn't taste bad at all. NOW brand has a good powder. Not sure about mercury but it gets lead.

    Cilantro is supposed to help chelate mercury. Supposed to also work topically if you apply a tincture of cilantro to your wrist pulse points.

    Alpha Lipoic Acid (regular tablets of the r & s forms, not just stabilized r form by itself) is supposed to help mobilize mercury although there is some debate as to whether or not it helps excrete mercury. If taken in large doses (300mg 3x/day) it makes your pee smell like a swamp, though, so it moves *something* out of the body.

    I'm not an expert but I have chelated and seen improvement in my health thereby, and what I've read leads me to believe you can't adequately chelate mercury using just foodstuffs. You need some more concentrated substances like supplements.
  9. jen1177

    jen1177

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    Can someone explain how pectin or other insoluble fiber, which remains in the intestines, is able to bind to heavy metals in the body? Since the mercury or aluminum or lead are in the body proper (organs and tissues and bloodstream)...how does the fiber in the intestines chelate or bind to it?
    While I seem to be having big improvements in my health due to eating a naturally high-pectin diet, I don't understand how it is working. Maybe the pectin is simply binding to toxins in the gut, which then reduces my problems from leaky gut, and then my liver and kidneys are better able to deal with the toxins/metals in the body proper...?
    merylg likes this.
  10. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Clear Light
    Coriander is supposed to be good too.
    merylg likes this.
  11. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Coriander = cilantro. You need to be cautious with this. It actually mobilizes, and need something else to bind, eg. chlorella. Dr. Klinghardt, autism, lyme, pyroluria exepert is very enthusiastic about chlorella. It's what I've used successfully, including in enemas.
    golden and merylg like this.
  12. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    I feel terrible if l eat coriander leaf. I get severe pain at the base of my skull and feel like mercury has been released.
  13. sregan

    sregan Senior Member

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    I get nightmares if I eat too close to bedtime.
  14. shah78

    shah78 Senior Member

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    Cutler 101: single bond pseudo- chelators are death(for many people). ALA I so cheap, so available, so effective.. Why look elsewhere?

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