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MIT develops new method of treating viruses

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Tristen, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. Tristen

    Tristen Senior Member

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    http://bostinnovation.com/2011/08/0...p-new-method-to-cure-a-broad-range-of-viruses

    "Now, researchers at MITs Lincoln Lab have developed a new method to treat a broad range of viruses, not just one specifically, in mice. As part of the PANACEA (which stands for Pharmacological Augmentation of Nonspecific Anti-pathogen Cellular Enzymes and Activities) project, the researchers have created an antiviral treatment called DRACO (or Double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] Activated Caspase Oligomerizer)".
     
  2. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    DRACO has the potential to revolutionize the treatment and prevention of virtually all viral diseases, including everything from the common cold to Ebola.

    Sounds promising but wonder how long this will take to translate into practice.
     
  3. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    That sounds very exciting - thanks for posting Tristen.
     
  4. Tony Mach

    Tony Mach Show me the evidence.

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    Isn't Ampligen double-stranded RNA? How does this differ from Ampligen (or what is the same)?
     
  5. Tristen

    Tristen Senior Member

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    Yea, the question is how long to clinical trials. I just found it very interesting.
     
  6. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    Man I hate vague press-releases. I guess I will have to wait for the paper. :)
     
  7. valentinelynx

    valentinelynx Senior Member

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    So, it sounds like: double stranded RNA "activates" a caspase oligomerizer. Um, to me that sounds like certain viruses, those that have double stranded RNA, trigger this new agent, which then causes caspases to "oligomerize" which means to stick together. Presumably that's to make the caspases work better?

    What I found on Wikipedia about capsases:

    "Caspases are essential in cells for apoptosis, or programmed cell death, in development and most other stages of adult life, and have been termed "executioner" proteins for their roles in the cell. Some caspases are also required in the immune system for the maturation of lymphocytes.


    My guess is that, in this case, where the interest in in combatting viruses rather than cancer, the intent would be to speed the maturation of lymphocytes. Although I suppose that stimulating apoptosis of infected cells could be beneficial for diseases where the virus spends most of its time lurking in cells where it is not accessible to lymphocytes or other immune system mechanisms. I really am guessing wildly here!

    Reminds me of someone's post I read on a witchcraft forum (really), in which the guy, with absolute certainty, stated that someone else was off base in understanding Einstein's Theory of Relativity. The poster went on to say it was totally obvious that E=mc2 means that when an object travels at twice the speed of light (he later corrected himself to say he meant travels at the speed of light squared), then the object puts out energy! Point being, I hope that my guess here is slightly more likely to be accurate?

    Immunologists out there?
     

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