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Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by MeSci, Nov 9, 2014.

  1. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    http://www.bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g6015

    Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies

    BMJ 2014;349:g6015


    Published 28 October 2014
    1. Karl Michaëlsson, professor1,
    2. Alicja Wolk, professor2,
    3. Sophie Langenskiöld, senior lecturer3,
    4. Samar Basu, professor3,
    5. Eva Warensjö Lemming, researcher14,
    6. Håkan Melhus, professor5,
    7. Liisa Byberg, associate professor1

     
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  2. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    Just seen another reference to this study, so had another quick skim-read. This bit is perhaps important:

     
  3. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    One problem with using milk to prevent osteoporosis, is that although milk is a good source of calcium, it isn't a good source of magnesium and vitamin D & K, which are necessary for the utilization of calcium.
     
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  4. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    I think pasteurized/defatted milk lacks D and K. I suppose green pastured butter is a rich source of those vits.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2014
  5. GracieJ

    GracieJ Senior Member

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    I studied this in great depth about twenty years ago.

    It seems the body uses up far more calcium than is taken in just digesting milk, and there was some suspicion about whether or not the calcium in the milk is even bioavailable.

    One country looked at was Japan. As it adopted western ways, including ice cream consumption, osteoporosis increased. There may be other factors along with that, of course, but the correlation is worth thinking about.
     
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  6. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    This chart about net calcium gain loss from different foods may interest you. Sorry about small text. You can increase the size by clicking on the image.

    upload_2014-12-28_19-12-10.png
     
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  7. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    This is not that new actually, the theory at least has been around for quite a few years/decades whereby increased intake of calcium (via dairy consumption or high ca supplements) messes up long-term hormonal handling of calcium and other minerals. In this scenario all is seemingly well until the menopause in most cases, after which it is all downhill. I don't remember details or if there were many studies supporting this theory but it made loads of sense. Some of it may be covered here http://www.calciumlie.com/osteoporosis/
     
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  8. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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