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Milk from Grass-fed Cows

Discussion in 'Lifestyle Management' started by HopingSince88, May 29, 2010.

  1. HopingSince88

    HopingSince88 Senior Member

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    New study out on the healthy benefits of CLA - in grass-fed cows. I have been drinking whole milk for about 6 months now. I feel much better on whole milk vs 2% or skim. Also, whenever possible I buy raw, although I have to travel 20 miles to get it, so that does not happen as often as I would like.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100528/hl_nm/us_milk_grass_fed_cows
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Hi HopingSince88,

    Could you post a link to the new study?

    Milk is complex, we are still doing new science on it. I keep reading about saturated fats in milk, but milk contains more than that in its fat component.

    I suspect you already know this, but I would be remiss if I didn't post it just in case. From around 1988we have known that whole milk induces elevated glutathione levels. Since ME and CFS are high oxidative stress disorders, this is very beneficial, as glutathione is a powerful antioxidant.

    There is a reason that milk is cooked till its dead though, every so often a whole lot of people die from drinking raw milk. Indeed the current temperature they heat milk to is partly related to increasing it every time a bunch of people drop dead from contaminated milk, in the hope that the new temperature will be high enough to kill all pathogens.

    Bye
    Alex


  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Hi HopingSince88

    Sorry about that, just saw the link. This must be a bad brain day, maybe I shouldn't post until tomorrow, although maybe its just because I focus so heavily on what interests me that I don't see anything else. ;-)

    bye
    Alex
  4. HopingSince88

    HopingSince88 Senior Member

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    Hello Alex,

    That link is just to the news article. I looked for a published study, but did not find it. I see that the lead researcher is at Harvard and I found a profile page for her with a list with links to all her published papers, but this one is not there (yet): http://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/PROFILES/ProfileDetails.aspx?Person=HC20

    Maybe I can find a way to email the right department at Harvard to get the paper or a link to it.

    The State of Maine allows the sale of raw milk, and has for some time. As far as I know there have not been problems with safety. My own experience has been that I feel very satisfied after drinking raw milk...a stick to your ribs type feeling. And I seem to have better energy too. I tried to make my own yogurt from it, but was unsuccessful, so I buy this product also made from raw milk. I also purchase cheese from raw milk (cow or sheep, I don't like goat).

    A good resource for reading on this is the Weston A Price foundation. There are a lot of very old studies (from the 1920's and 30's) referenced on their website. Sally Fallon has a book out entitled "Nourishing Traditions" which discusses raw milk, CLA's and such in detail.

    Check out this webpage with information from 1929 at realmilk.com:
    http://www.realmilk.com/milkcure.html
  5. awol

    awol *****

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    I am continually surprised by ow many people on this forum seem to have no problem with dairy. I am happy for you! For me, it doesn't matter where the cow came from, how it is fed, or what is done to the milk afterwards....it still has casein. It therefore still gives me digestive problems and large ugly sores on my neck. YIKES!
  6. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    I can't handle casein in any form either ... I've tried everything I could think of including raw cheddar goat cheese which was supposed to be the easiest to digest. I get dark circles under my eyes within a day or so and these last 7 - 10 days after I've removed casein.

    I'm on the Paleo diet and Dr. Cordain, and others as well, say that our bodies weren't designed to drink dairy. I'm not versed on biochemistry well enough to form my own opinion but I think it's interesting that dairy and gluten are big problems for many autistic kids. I don't understand how these chemicals can turn into opiods for some ... but ... I can certainly relate to gluten acting like an opiod in me. I was actually buzzing from the stuff ... And it will still cause nuero symptoms for me.

    X

    PS. If my doctor hadn't told me that getting raccoon eyes was a sign that I couldn't handle dairy, I wouldn't have suspected it was really a problem. I never saw any other effects from it ... And my labs came back negative for casein allergy.
  7. HopingSince88

    HopingSince88 Senior Member

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    Awol and Xchocoholic-

    I am just curious whether either of you has ever tried raw milk.

    I think of regular supermarket milk as drinking synthetic product rather than a natural one.

    Also, if your allergy tests are negative for casein, are you sure you aren't sensitive to lactose? In pasteurized milk the lactase that predigests the lactose is destroyed by the process. Some folks have trouble because of the lactose and not the casein.

    I do think that diet has a big part in how we feel, and that each of us has very individual responses to foods. What works for some of us will not work for others. I have been tested for celiac (scoped and biopsy) and was negative. But I notice that when I eat wheat products I have certain reactions. So I may not have a 'real' allergy, but I do have some kind of sensitivity and therefore, it does not matter to me what an allergist says to me, I just keep away from wheat, because I listen to my body when it speaks...or at least I try to.
  8. Frank

    Frank Senior Member

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    Even the race of cow might matter to ppl being allergic or not to the milk.
  9. camas

    camas Senior Member

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    I was a ranch kid and have always been allergic to milk, raw or otherwise. (Didn't get me out of milking duties, however.) I agree with Charlie Russell and a lot of other old cowboys who said cow's milk is for calves. :Retro wink:

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