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Migraine medicine made me feel slightly better next day

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by curecfs, May 3, 2011.

  1. curecfs

    curecfs

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    I've been having weird headaches for a couple years and finally saw a neurologist the other day. He says they are most likely migraines (vascular). He gave me a sample of a drug called Treximet (sumatriptan & naproxen sodium - 85/500mg). He told me I should try to take it when I feel a headache coming on. Since my head was feeling a little "off" last night and I had been crying a little bit (I do a lot and crying is a trigger), I decided to take a pill before I went to sleep. I didn't like the way it made me feel...nausea, tightness in my chest, groggy/dizzy, and more emotional. So I went to sleep as usual and also took my normal sleep meds, Ambien CR and Clonazepam 1mg. When I woke up today my head actually felt more "clear" and I was slightly more alert and felt more rested than I have in a LONG time. I certainly wasn't ready to go do anything major, but the effect was noticeable. I would describe it as having more mental energy than physical. Now, it is not feasible for me to take this medicine every night before bed but I'm wondering what action it had on my brain that gave me this boost the next day. I understand that migraines are caused by inflammation in the blood vessels of the brain and I read that the ingredient in that medication (sumatriptan) basically reduces vascular inflammation. So could "brain inflammation" be causing some of the fatigue and brain fog symptoms??
     
  2. glenp

    glenp "and this too shall pass"

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    Vancouver Canada suburbs
    Triptans make me feel better too and think that i would feel much better if I took them every day.

    glen
     
  3. curecfs

    curecfs

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    Hmm, interesting. Do you know if there are any generic/non-expensive ones out there? I also wonder if it there would be unintended side-effects by taking them daily.

     
  4. glenp

    glenp "and this too shall pass"

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    IDK - I was taking over 12 a month of the maxalt- the physicians here have lots of samples to give out- I have samples of others that can take after the start of migraine. I took minocycline for 6 months and it reduced my migrines by 90%, I stopped about 4 months ago and my migraines are slowly coming back- plus symptoms I relate to migraines. My head always hurts and its hard to tell the start of a migraine. I know I would feel better taking a triptan but dont unless its actual migraine - dont know how safe it is to do it - who does?? We are on our own with each other. I think I may ask for another antibiotic as the minocycline helped me so much IDK

    glen
     
  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I wonder is some CFS cases could be equally classed as 'chronic migraine'.

    Taking lots of migraine treatements can lead to 'rebound headaches' which are meant to be even worse, and are a real pain to get rid of... so take care of that.
     
  6. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    Article of interest on this topic:


    Protein Controls Brain Inflammation

    May 3, 2011

    A new protein, called aquaporin-4, is making waves and found to play a key role in brain inflammation, or encephalitis. This discovery is important as the first to identify a role for this protein in inflammation, opening doors for the development of new drugs that treat brain inflammation and other conditions at the cellular level rather than just treating the symptoms. This discovery was published in the May 2011 issue of The FASEB Journal.

    "Our study establishes a novel role for a water channel, aquaporin-4, in neuroinflammation, as well as a cell-level mechanism," says Alan Verkman, a senior researcher involved in the work from the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology at the Univ. of California, San Francisco. "Our data suggest that inhibition or down-regulation of aquaporin-4 expression in brain and spinal cord may offer a new therapeutic option in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and other conditions associated with neuroinflammation."

    Scientists compared normal mice and mice without genes for producing aquaporin-4 using a model of brain inflammation. These experiments showed significantly reduced brain inflammation in the mice that did not produce aquaporin-4. Researchers then systematically investigated the various possible causes of this reduced neuroinflammation and surprisingly found that aquaporin-4 deletion causes the brain to be less susceptible to inflammation, involving differences in astrocyte reaction to stress. The involvement of aquaporin-4 in brain inflammation provides a new determinant and better understanding of how the brain responses to inflammatory stresses. This suggests that using drugs or other agents that target this protein may be effective for treating a variety of conditions associated with brain or spinal cord inflammation.

    "This a new lead in our efforts to stem inflammation in the brain," says Gerald Weissmann, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "The importance of water movement in and out of cells cannot be understated, and this paper helps to clarify what has otherwise been a muddy view of aquaporins."

    Source: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

    http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/...otein-controls-brain-inflammation-050311.aspx
     
  7. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    Before I had my doctors that did all of the blood tests to stop my migraines, I had them for years. It was horrible. I tried several tripan meds. They were even worse that the migraine, made me so dizzy and ill and I still had the migraine. Some people do fine with them and that is great.

    The cause with mine and many other people is hormone imbalance. I am very happy that long chapter in my life is over.
     
  8. Ian

    Ian Senior Member

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    Take magnesium.
     
  9. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    Magnesium helps some people for sure, the right amount. B vits, etc also. There are other reasons for migraines so all supplements can be tried especially since they are good for many reasons. I take many but the bio hormones, five in all, have been my answer.
     
  10. Nielk

    Nielk

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    Hi Zerox,

    Welcome to the forum.
    I hope you get all the information and support that I've been getting here. You've landed in a good spot.

    Nielk
     

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