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Microbial Transplantation Found to Be Possible Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Only a very small study but still very interesting. This treatment seems to be very cost effective and has the potential to even cure patients from C. difficile infection and colitis. The only problem I see is, that regulation prevents progress in this field. Moreover there are no incentives for big pharma companies to offer this kind of treatment, because it is so cost-effective. So who pays for the trials? How long do we have to wait, till it gets approved? 5 years? 10 years?

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130405112859.htm

    Apr. 4, 2013 — A Spectrum Health clinical trial has found that fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) has resulted in the improvement or absence of symptoms in most pediatric patients with active ulcerative colitis.

    The phase I clinical trial of the procedure was conducted by members of the Pediatric Specialty Department of the Spectrum Health Medical Group at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, the first in the country to study FMT in children...
    The study results have been published online by the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition and will be featured in the June print edition.
    "We believe that the procedure may restore 'abnormal' bacteria to 'normal' in patients with ulcerative colitis. Our short-term study looked at the safety and tolerability of FMT for these patients."
    ...
    Dr. Kunde explained that this single-center pilot study enrolled 10 children and young adults, ages 7-20 years, with mild to moderate ulcerative colitis...
    Clinical response was evaluated with the Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index (PUCAI) score which measures disease activity of ulcerative colitis. Clinical response to FMT was defined as decrease in the PUCAI score by 15 points. These scores were collected at baseline and weekly for four weeks after transplantation.
    Results showed that, 78 percent subjects achieved clinical response within one week while 67 percent subjects maintained clinical response at one month after FMT. Thirty-three percent subjects did not show any symptoms of ulcerative colitis after FMT. Patient's clinical disease activity (PUCAI score) significantly improved after FMT compared to the baseline. No serious adverse events were noted. One of the 10 subjects could not hold the enema.
    "Patients often face a tough choice between various medications that have significant side effects. Allowing the disease to progress can lead to surgical removal of their colon," said Dr. Kunde. "Our study showed that fecal enemas were feasible and well-tolerated by children with ulcerative colitis. Adverse events were mild to moderate, acceptable, self-limited, and manageable by patients."
    Studies with a larger sample size and longer follow-up period are needed to determine the true efficacy of FMT in patients with ulcerative colitis, however this trial suggests that the unique biologic is a potentially effective treatment, said Dr. Kunde.
    ...
    "This study opens the doors for an innovative, inexpensive and natural alternative to improve outcomes of this debilitating disease with billions of dollars in health care cost," said Dr. Kunde. "However, we are still in very early stages of this field and need more evidence in terms of scientifically robust multicenter clinical trials before we can offer this to patients on clinical basis. Caution must be taken that FMT should be offered by centers that follow regulatory guidelines around this new therapy and have facilities and resources available to perform the procedure."
    maryb likes this.
  2. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I think this could be a huge step forward for all of us who have digestive issues.
    Long term think its going to be down to the gastroenterologists who really care about their patients and not just about throwing drugs at them. Some are getting interested but - the Health and Safety issue is a biggie. NHS are just scared of getting sued. Short term it'll be up to those again who can pay privately.

    And the public really need to get their head around it, people who go - oooh its poo!! I mean what do they think bodily functions are all about, get over it..........
  3. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    maryb: But even you can pay for it, you still have the problem of where to go. The most important part of a microbial transplant is safety. It has to be checked for all possible infections. Regarding the "yuck" factor, there already seems to be a solution:

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/254864.php

    Few treatments exist for people infected with the nasty gut superbugC.difficile, although new approaches based on transplanting fecal matter taken from stools of healthy people are proving successful. Now a new study claims poop made artificially in the lab not only cures the infection more effectively, but is safer, more stable and adaptable, and overcomes the "yuck" factor that puts patients, and some medical professionals, off this type of treatment.
  4. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    Pretty incredible that it can be made in a lab but sounds brilliant research. Lets hope some money is put into it. Again eventually it'll be down to cost.

    There is a clinic near London offering the real stuff in 10 infusions over 10 days - they provide the donor (screened) and its £4000:eek:
  5. I'm seriously considering shelling out the £4000 for this but I just can't make up my mind. It looks like the most promising treatment for CFS I can find, but it's such a large amount of money and might not work! I wish there were more studies done on this, or at least a load of anecdotal repots, but I can't seem to find much.
  6. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I would say if you have massive gut problems and money is no object its worth a try. If its a question of you can only afford 1 sort of treatment then its a big ask.

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