Professor & patients' paper on the solvable biological challenge of ME/CFS: reader-friendly version
Simon McGrath provides a patient-friendly version of a peer-reviewed paper which highlights some of the most promising biomedical research on ME/CFS ...
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Microbes, molecular mimicry and molecules of mood and motivation

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by JaimeS, Jan 3, 2016.

  1. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    This is:

    1) About CFS -- ME is not mentioned -- and other 'functional' disorders.

    2) Mostly a research proposal

    3) Coupled with a suggestion for treatment (immunoglobulin therapy)

    4) Despite the title, the content PROBABLY won't infuriate you. Despite being British (!) the authors seem to consider the psychogenic theory to be bunk. The line goes something along the lines of, "even if it's true that x psychological syndrome is more common in the patient population, it still can't be causative."


    Link leads to pdf of entire article.

    Microbes, molecular mimicry and molecules of mood and motivation

    J.A. Morris, S.J. Broughton, Q. Wessels


    Abstract
    The hypothesis proposed is that functional disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and anorexia nervosa are caused by auto-antibodies to neuronal proteins induced by molecular mimicry with microbial antigens. The age incidence of these conditions, the marked female excess, increase with economic and technological advance, precipitation by infection, and the paucity of histological changes are all consistent with the hypothesis. It can be tested directly using human sera to search for cross reaction with brain proteins in model systems such as Drosophila melanogaster. The conditions might be amenable to treatment using pooled immunoglobulin. Identification and elimination from the microbial flora of the bacteria that express the cross reacting antigens should be possible.


    I'm curious as to what you guys will think of this one, if anything. It's an odd little article.

    -J
     
    ahmo, Skippa, Valentijn and 2 others like this.
  2. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Mmmmmm...Maybe meaningful.
     
    JaimeS likes this.
  3. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    I think the problem is that the molecular mimicry theory is pretty much a dead duck. And I cannot quite see why you would test for antibodies to human brain using a fruit fly. The traditional technique, which has been tried in ME/CFS is to use human brain!
     
    JaimeS and MeSci like this.
  4. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    ....fruit fly?

    *sigh*
     

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