The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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Michael Sharpe lying about us in Companion to Psychiatric Studies

Discussion in 'Action Alerts and Advocacy' started by justinreilly, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. justinreilly

    justinreilly Senior Member

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    Editor Michael Sharpe lying about ME again in his book Companion to Psychiatric Studies (Sept. 2010). Check it out on Google and then write a review on Google, and copy and past it to Amazon.co.uk and Amazon, Please everyone write a review, they influence sales which takes money out of Sharpe's pocket; money he is making by lying about us.

    Read the lies:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=h19Ktqlc5nUC&q=CFS#v=onepage&q=Chronic Fatigue&f=false

    then write a review:
    - on the Google page you viewed the book.

    - Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Companion-P...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1309595541&sr=1-1

    - Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Companion-Psy...dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

    - B&N: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Companion-to-Psychiatric-Studies/Eve-C-Johnstone/e/9780702031373

    Edit: added info on Google and Amazon.co.uk
     
  2. wdb

    wdb Senior Member

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  3. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Thanks Justin - such a fundamental flaw - CFS + ME = neurotic disorders really raises doubts about all "classifications" used in the publication. Will try to add to your superb comment later.
     
  4. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Just look at it as "hard evidence", direct from the horse's mouth, for when he's brought to trial ;)
     
  5. Nielk

    Nielk

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    I just wrote a review. I hope they don't sell one book!
     
  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    I read the available CFS sections and felt comfortable enough to give it a bad review.
     
  7. justinreilly

    justinreilly Senior Member

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    Thank you guys for posting your reviews! There are now 6 one star reviews!

    I am copying them here in the small chance they get taken down. It's not likely- I have posted over 200 reviews and had 2 taken down to my knowledge. I wasn't informed of it so I don't know why they were but I think it was because of accusing the authors of wrongdoing. If I learn any of them have been taken down I will contact you so we can work on an edited version.

     
  8. jace

    jace Off the fence

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    Here's a couple of quotes to get you going

    You can review and rate on Google Books too.
     
  9. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Will try to do this. Hey Justin, why not change/add on to your signature for the voting contest? Are you voting daily?

    GG
     
  10. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Yeah, what! Could this also be said about MS or any other disease?:

    "P. 716 ".... well illustrated by the controversy and conflict that has surrounded the condition called chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) (Prins et al 2006, Sharpe 1996). Many doctors consider the condition to be a psychiatric one as there is no established bodily pathology; others and many patients consider it to be a medical one because the patient presnts whith physical symptoms. And in practice the patients are commonly rejected by both specialities."

    GG

    Oh, i see this comment: "Other examples include tuberculosis, syphilis, MS, Parkinson's, asthma, peptic ulcers, rheumatoid arthritis... "

    PS I went and said yes, to all the "good" comments left by people about the inadequacies of the author. FYI Perhaps this will keep things from being changed, if possible, and will help our cause against misinformation!

    PSS I would suggest that we/people do use the words ME and CFS alone, if possible. Also, please don't use the ME/CFS combo. I believe there are good reasons not to! I think we are just helping the cause by using ME/CFS, I think it just muddies the waters!
     
  11. jace

    jace Off the fence

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    Hi ggingues, do you want us always to use myalgic encephalomyelitis, or something else?
     
  12. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Sorry for the confusion, but use of ME and CFS is ok, just not together. (ie ME/CFS). Sorry, this is a relatively new thing for me also. I realized after making the comment that my signature had it in the info!

    GG
     
  13. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Hi ggingues, I spent some months always referring to ME and CFS separately, and sometimes still do. It never caught on. We don't know the relationship - my best guess is overlapping sets, with the CFS set overlapping with all sorts of things. However, we do not know for sure that ME is a single disorder, or just a spectrum from those who look like pure ME to those who have mild CFS. We lack data, another casualty of the abysmal research funding since 1934 or even before that.

    I have no problem referring to them separately, and I do like to refer to the names used in studies when referring to those - if its a CFS study I write CFS. The problem is we really need to differentiate between CFSO (Oxford), CFSF (Fukuda) and CFSC (Canadian) - and there are more definitions including Holmes, Australian and Empiric.

    This naming issue is semantic games of the worst kind. I really think we are not going to fix it until we have a whole new name, based on a definitive uncomplicated diagnostic test, or an understanding of underlying pathophysiology. I do agree that we need to get rid of all mention of fatigue, I don't have fatigue, I have something else that is only called fatigue because of ignorance - mine and theirs. PER or post exertional relapse is more accurate - which would make CFS into CPERS. Jeepers, is that a good acronym?

    Bye
    Alex
     

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