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Methylcobalamin causes tachycardia - why?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by adreno, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    That might be true for you, Fredddd, but some of us also need a considerable amount of magnesium.

    Magnesium is responsible for over 300 functions in the body. There are many articles about this here:
    http://www.naturalnews.com/magnesium.html
    Valentijn likes this.
  2. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Dreambirdies,

    The balance is important. If one increases potassium by 2 grams and sodium and calcium and magenesium a standard proportion it won't work. That was what I was trying to say, not that other things were not needed but that adding ALL electrolytes indiscrimnantly becasue the rate of potassium usage went up most is not going to work. It was a CAUTION, not what proportion works best for everybody.

    That might be true for you, Fredddd, but some of us also need a considerable amount of magnesium.

    Magnesium is responsible for over 300 functions in the body. There are many articles about this here.

    Of course it is very important. That is why it is on the critical cofactor list I been putting up for the last 8 years. Why would you think otherwise?
  3. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    I believe the answer is that hypermethylation causes hypokalemia (in some people at least). Maybe this is a hormonal effect, I don't know. In any case, the only thing that permanently corrects the hypokalemia is to remove the excess of methyl donors.
    Lotus97 likes this.
  4. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Magnesium deficiency can increase the likelihood of hypokalemia (low potassium).
    http://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/18/10/2649.full
    Supplementing with taurine can help maintain electrolyte balance and helps your cells retain magnesium and potassium. Taurine and magnesium can also help with excitotoxicity which can be exacerbated during the methylation process. Some people have problems with sulphur containing supplements so I'd recommend starting on a low dose of Taurine. Nature's Life and Now Foods sell taurine in powder form which is the most affordable. Taurine and all free form amino acids are recommended to be taken on an empty stomach or at least without protein.
  5. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    Thanks, Lotus. I didn't know taurine can do this. I have some in my bottomless pit vitamin stash. I will have to try it out and see. I've had issues with both low magnesium and low potassium. If the taurine could help my cells maintain both, then that sounds good to me.
  6. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    It's hard to say what will work for you. Supplements seem to have different effects for different people, but I hope it works for you.:thumbsup: I haven't had any of my minerals/metals tested so I'm sort of flying blind right now. For example, I've suspected copper toxicity in myself based on symptoms, but my symptoms could also be from malfunctioning adrenals (which I know I have). It's true that copper toxicity can screw up adrenals, but so can Lyme and I know I have Lyme:thumbdown:(it says this emoticon is thumbs down, but it looks more like someone scratching their head as if pondering something and/or confused)
    Dreambirdie likes this.
  7. nicola

    nicola

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    This is a very late reply, but I think I have just found out why this is. I get this too, and also have POTS. When I was taking high doses of B12 I was also having to take a LOT of potassium to stop my heart racing. B12 is a vasodilator, so it opens up the veins and arteries, which, frankly, is the last thing someone with POTS wants. Most POTS treatment is aimed at vasoconstriction to keep the heart rate lower. Other vasodilators which I have found have this effect are magnesium and alcohol, and progesterone and potassium have diuretic effects, which is also bad for POTS. Vasoconstrictors work the opposite way, and I am much more comfortable when I take calcium, or at least balance magnesium with calcium. During the high progesterone time of my cycle I counter with bioavailable estrogen. I think we people with POTS have to be very aware of vasoconstrictors and dilators and make sure there is balance in what we do. I don't know what balances out B12. I think we can just take very small doses of it ...
    :-(
    Lotus97 likes this.
  8. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    As is being discussed on another thread on extreme potassium need, excess B2 in relation to the MeCbl-methylfolate and who knows what else appears to be a contributing cause .
  9. Red04

    Red04 Senior Member

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    Stopping excess methyl donors probably would have permanently corrected my wife's hypokalemia symptoms too. But, my wife's hypokalemia went away as she healed the other 50 symptoms. She takes the same methylation supplements/dosages as when she was still ill. So, I guess, for her, "healing" was enough to permanently correct it. She takes no potassium supplements and has a fairly poor diet and has not had hypokalemia symptoms outside of pregnancy for a few years.

    I don't know how common this is. A few years ago I seem to remember that there was a lot of talk of potassium demand going away as you worked your way to good health. I don't recall reading much of that lately. It certainly the case for us.

    I guess I could ramp up the b2 and see what happens, but that seems mean.

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