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methylation and pernicious anemia?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Gavman, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. Gavman

    Gavman Senior Member

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    Sydney
    Hi team,

    I was wondering whether pernicious anemia fits into the methylation difficulties as a symptom or subset of the whole issue? As I see it, methylation is the big picture and pernicious anemia would be a more specific/small picture within the cycle?

    And obviously having red blood cells helps give energy to people, I recall back in about 07 that a live blood analysis showed me having potential megaloblastic anemia; should this have been picked up as a potential b12 deficiency?

    Also, are the building blocks for forming whole and working red blood cells b12, folic acid and iron? And to eliminate any viruses/bacteria or gut issues that could be contributing to these nutritional deficiencies.
     
  2. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Gavman.

    Pernicious anemia causes an absolute deficiency of B12 in the body. In ME/CFS, there is a fumctional deficiency of B12, caused by glutathione depletion. Both result in deficits in the two active coenzyme forms of B12, methylB12 and adenosylB12. The deficit in methylB12 will cause a partial block of the methylation cycle in both these conditions.

    A deficiency in intracellular folate, which can be caused by a deficiency in methylB12, is a main cause of megaloblastic anemia.

    B12, folate and iron are three of the essential nutrients needed to make red blood cells. Many others are needed as well.

    Yes, gut-related problems can interfere with the absorption of essential nutrients.

    Best regards,

    Rich
     
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  3. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    How long does it take to correct anemia? I've recently started taking B12 for methylation and I'm also getting iron from spirulina. I haven't actually had my iron tested, but my HGB, HCT, and RBC were all low last time I was tested. The reason I ask is because I have a doctor's appointment in a few weeks and will probably be getting tested within a month or two afterwards.
     
  4. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    Lotus, I deal with anemia, too, although not pernicious anemia. Do you get ferritin tested when you have a blood draw? My doctor asks for that when I have blood work because it's a measure of stored iron.

    I've been able to raise ferritin by taking Solgar's Gentle Iron. It contains the bisglycinate form, considered well absorbable. I have zero digestive problems or side effects from taking it. A lot of iron supplements are constipating.
     
  5. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I think the methyl/folate trap might have caused my anemia since my HGB was normal the year before I tested low and I wasn't taking iron then either, but I also wasn't taking as much folic acid. I found this quote by Rich
    The reason why red blood cells are larger and contain more hemoglobin than normal in ME/CFS is that the cells in the bone marrow that produce new blood cells do not have enough folate. Certain forms of folate are needed to make DNA and RNA, which are needed to make new cells. Since the bone marrow is not able to make red cells in normal numbers, it stuffs more hemoglobin into each one it does make, and that raises both MCV (their size) and MCH (their hemoglobin content).

    The reason why these cells do not have enough folates is that there is a partial block in methionine synthase, which links the methylation cycle to the folate metabolism. Because of this block, folates continue to be converted to methylfolate (this is called the "methyl trap" mechanism), but it cannot be used by the methionine synthase reaction. Instead, peroxynitrite, which rises because of the depletion of glutathione, breaks down the methylfolate, and that depletes the folates in general.
     
    goonie8473 likes this.

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