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methyl B12 superior to hydroxy B12 to raise GSH and protect neurons

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by gu3vara, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. gu3vara

    gu3vara Senior Member

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  2. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, gu3vara.

    I think it's interesting, too. I don't completely understand it, though. The thing that surprises me is that adding methylcobalamin to the cells in culture doubled their glutathione, while the other two forms of B12 didn't change it. I don't understand that. I can understand that this would likely have speeded up methioinine synthase, but it would seem that that would have lowered the flow down the transsulfuration pathway to make glutathione, so I'm puzzled by this.

    Concerning the thimerosal part of the experiment, I think it could be that the methylcobalamin, which was present at 100 times the concentration of the thimerosal, was able to react with it to methylate the mercury in it, and thus eliminate it as an influence on the cells. The other two forms of B12 did not have methyl groups, and that may have allowed the mercury to block enzymes involved with glutathione synthesis, lowered glutathione below the detection limit. It's interesting that adding methylcobalamin with the thimerosal brought the glutathione level up to the level of the control, but not twice this level, as methylcobalamin alone did. I also don't understand that.

    Thimerosal apparently blocked the conversion of cyano- and hydroxocobalamin to methylcobalamin. This suggests that it blocks enzymes in the intracellular B12 metabolism, in addition to blocking enzymes in the pathway for synthesizing glutathione.

    Well, one thing this confirms it that thimerosal is clearly bad stuff. I'm glad it has mostly been taken out of the vaccines. It's apparently not the only bad actor there, but it sure was one of them.

    Thanks for posting this. Oh, one more thing: Note that Waly used to be in Dick Deth's group at Northeastern U. in Boston. They've done a lot of good work.

    Best regards,

    Rich
     
  3. gu3vara

    gu3vara Senior Member

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    No problem Rich, I thought it would be of interest to you.

    Thx for your analysis, I know it's quite puzzling!
     

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