Julie Rehmeyer's 'Through the Shadowlands'
Writer Never Give Up talks about Julie Rehmeyer's new book "Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer's Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn't Understand" and shares an interview with Julie ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Methyl-acceptors?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by dannybex, Nov 13, 2014.

  1. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    I've read in several places that niacin is considered a 'methyl-acceptor' (or some say 'methyl-sponge'), but my doc said that B1, B2, and CoQ10 are also methyl-acceptors.


    Does anyone know if this is correct? The only mention I could find was from a book online:



    B1-B2-B3-CoQ10-METHYL-ACCEPTORS!.png
     
  2. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes:
    1,033
    I think it makes sense. There are many other discussions in this board talking about the appropriate balance of B1, B2 and B3 in a methylation protocol.

    High doses of those can make one's need for methylfolate and methyl-B12 "insatiable" as Freddd used to say. If you search a little bit you can find long threads about this issue.

    cheers
     
    dannybex likes this.
  3. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,022
    On the other hand, B2 is also necessary for the methylation cycle.
     
    dannybex likes this.
  4. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes:
    1,033
    Sure and so is B3, because of the role of NAD in the folate cyle, IIRC.
     
    dannybex likes this.
  5. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    Can you explain this in more 'user-friendly' detail Peter? Thanks in advance…

    And the same for B2? I remember 'Dog Person' suggesting it's necessary, but can't remember the details…?

    Thanks Adreno.
     
  6. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes:
    1,033
    I am not a biochemist so my understanding is not very in depth.
    FAD (B2) and NAD (B3) are necessary for the MTHFR enzyme to do its work:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylenetetrahydrofolate_reductase#Biochemistry
     
  7. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,340
    Likes:
    6,528
    Northcoast NSW, Australia
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2014
    rippe and PeterPositive like this.
  8. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    Thanks @ahmo -- I know Lynch has a lot of videos out there, so I appreciate your posting this one. I like the way he has been studying this in depth and has (at least most times) admitted if he's learned something new and makes changes accordingly (the infamous CBS mutation as one example).
     
    PennyIA likes this.
  9. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,569
    Likes:
    3,559
    Could you please post a link to that?
     
  10. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    From his "Seeking Health" Facebook page, confirmed via email -- see "Seeking Health's" reply…


    "...absolutely fine to take taurine - it supports magnesium absorption and electrolyte balance. The whole CBS upregulation and reducing sulfur long term is far from safe - or accurate. One needs sulfur - and this little bit of taurine is not going to harm - in fact, it's going to support."


    https://www.facebook.com/SeekingHealth/posts/831003603618985
     
  11. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,569
    Likes:
    3,559
    Ugh taurine knocks me out with sleepiness and brain fog. OTOH I can eat high sulfur foods w/o issues :confused:
    But I don't know my SNPs.
     
    dannybex likes this.
  12. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,022
    Those effects have likely nothing to do with sulfur. Taurine functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. The whole Yasko CBS tabernacle is bull.
     
    dannybex and Valentijn like this.
  13. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,097
    Likes:
    17,173
    Some people use it at night due to its sedating effect.
     
  14. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,569
    Likes:
    3,559
    I fall asleep quickly but have to wake up in the middle of the night to urinate since sulfur has a highly diuretic effect in me. I think I am so full of metals that sulfur supplements get detox going :eek:
     
  15. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,022
    Again, taurine inhibits aldosterone, which has a diuretic effect.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2014
    Gondwanaland likes this.
  16. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,569
    Likes:
    3,559
    Thanks for the clarification :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2014
  17. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    I thought taurine had a slight diuretic effect, and aldosterone helps retain fluids??? :)
     
  18. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,022
    That's what I said. Or meant to say. The inhibition of aldosterone has a diuretic effect.
     
    dannybex likes this.
  19. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes:
    2,172
    Seattle
    Reviewing this thread again, it seems then like B2 anyway, is not a methyl-acceptor, like B3 -- it's a cofactor, at least at so-called 'normal' doses.

    I reduced, then basically stopped b2, with the exception of taking the RDA (1.7mgs), and my eyesight deteriorated big time during the last six weeks or so.
     
  20. Victronix

    Victronix Senior Member

    Messages:
    362
    Likes:
    133
    California
    Interesting, and good to know.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page