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ME/CFS Test? Can you raise your legs when lying down?

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Tilney, Aug 1, 2016.

  1. Tilney

    Tilney

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    This might seem silly question but I went for a medical recently and this was one of the things I was asked to do.

    While lying on the doctor’s couch I was asked to point my toes – think of being a ballerina standing on her tip toes – then raise both legs together in the air without bending at the knees.

    When I couldn’t do that the doctor said try again but pointing my toes upward, I couldn’t do that either.

    I’ve tried asking non ME/CFS people to try it and they can do it.

    So is not being able to raise your legs something to do with having ME/CFS?

    Or is it a sign of something different?

    I’ve tried looking online but the only thing I can find is it can be used as a test for meningitis.

    For your info. I live in the UK & have had a diagnosis of ME/CFS for approx... 15 years.

    Although this sometimes feels like a diagnosis of attention seeking raging hypochondriac who needs to get a life and stop wasting the big clever doctor’s valuable time.
     
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  2. belize44

    belize44 Senior Member

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    I just tried it, and can barely raise them an inch.
     
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  3. Tilney

    Tilney

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    Thank you for trying
    I can not find any info. on the internet about it being used as a ME/CFS test but as I said in the post all the other people I have asked to try it can do it but they don't have ME/CFS
     
  4. dancer

    dancer Senior Member

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    I'm not sure what that would test, except the strength of your hip flexor muscles and a bit of the core muscles.
    I've had ME/CFS for over eight years...mostly homebound and with fierce PEM after small activities, and I can do it.
     
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  5. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member

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    I can raise both of my legs with no problems.
     
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  6. Tilney

    Tilney

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    Thank you both for letting me know you can do it.
     
  7. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    I could hardly do it and i managed just few centimeters, I'm surprised. Why is it so difficult? I've been so tired recently anyhow.
     
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  8. Tilney

    Tilney

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    I have no idea why I/we can not do it.
    The first time I realised I couldn't do it was when the doctor asked me to do it.
    I can raise my legs if I bend them at my knees but not keeping them straight.
    Perhaps someone out there might know the answer ?
     
  9. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I can raise my legs without bending my knees no problem. But can barely raise them if I point my big toe pointing forward as you say. No idea why.
     
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  10. jodie100

    jodie100

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    I can't do it with both legs at the same time although I can lift each leg individually. I never noticed until I tried just it now but I don't know what it means either.
     
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  11. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

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    You could put ditto marks around Snow Leopard's post for me. Also easier to lift a single leg.

    The only thing this brings to mind is Trendelenburg's sign in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. People with Trendelenburg gait are not able to hold the pelvis level while walking. This puts three times the load on the lower hip joint and is likely to cause joint failure. If you have several close relatives who have needed hip replacements, you could have some of the genes seen in EDS, even if you don't have the full syndrome.
     
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  12. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    I can do it easily, both legs together, feet in either position.
     
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  13. Tilney

    Tilney

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    Thank you your reply could be very helpful
    Will look it up in the morning as my maternal grandmother had hip replacements.
    The last time I had a bone density scan my spine measurement was as previous but the hip measurement had decreased.
     
  14. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    From my experience with pilates, I'd guess that this is a core-strength, abs issue. I do pilates with machines (done lying down) and I am able to do this exercise, though I doubt if I could without pilates (or other) core training.
    I also have EDS.
    My guess it is related, in that most of us are not able to exercise to gain core strength, but that is it not directly related to ME/CFS.
     
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  15. AndyPR

    AndyPR Tired Sam ate all the cookies!

    Just tried it and had no problems with either, so I'm guessing it's a test for something else other than ME.
     
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  16. worldbackwards

    worldbackwards A unique snowflake

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    There was a time when couldn't. I'm a bit better now and I suspect I probably can. It's more a matter of how ill you are rather than what you have.
     
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  17. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Me, too. Totally shocked, as I do a few leg-raising exercises once in awhile. But this, both feet w/ toes pointed in either direction, is almost impossible.
     
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  18. Lindberg

    Lindberg

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    My doctor asked me to do a similar thing. After I had raised my leg straight up I was told to hold it there for a while. After I lowered it I was told to do the next one and hold it straight up for a while.

    Then he asked me to lift the first leg straight up again but this time he was holding it back/down just a few inches above the bed, using his own strength. I had to use the muscles quite a bit, as you can imagine.

    Everything worked out fine and I did the same thing with my other leg. But then he asked me to raise the first leg again and he would try to hold it down once more. And I could not raise it! I had just done it but couldn't do it again.

    Then he said: "Just as I thought, you have mitochondrial dysfunction." The beginning of my ME diagnosis.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
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  19. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    I've had a go at this twice and was able to do it fairly easily. I feel like I have some reasonably good strength in my tummy muscles actually, at least at the moment. Not sure why that is.
     
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  20. Mrs Sowester

    Mrs Sowester Senior Member

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    Toes pointed I can raise them about a foot with extreme difficulty. Toes pointing at the ceiling not at all.
     

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