The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

ME/CFS patients’ reports of symptom changes following CBT, GET and pacing treatments: Analysis...

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by AndyPR, Aug 29, 2017.

  1. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    Open access at http://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/hWSxVIBTzDtqisvafkhE/full
     
  2. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    This is the latest research from Dr Keith Geraghty which draws upon patient evidence provided in the ME Association 'no decision about me, without me' report on CBT, GET and Pacing, published in 2015.

    The MEA will be providing more commentary when we have had a chance to read the new review.

    From Keith on Twitter earlier:

    "@meassociation thank you for your support - to all who support the ME Association, thank you also. So much work to do, I'm inspired by you."

    Executive summary of MEA report, and link to the full 294 page report on acceptability, efficacy and safety of CBT, GET and Pacing:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2015/05/23959/

    ME Association trustees have approved a new research grant that will critically examine the theoretical basis that underlies the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Graded Exercise Therapy (GET) in ME/CFS.

    The £25,000 grant – over two years – has been given to Dr Keith Geraghty at the University of Manchester and will challenge and review the theoretical basis and clinical application of CBT and GET in the NHS.

    Dr Geraghty is an Honorary Research Fellow in Population Health, Health Sciences Research and Primary Care, where his work focuses on ME and CFS.

    More details here:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...-treatments-recommended-by-nice-13-july-2017/

    Dr Charles Shepherd
    Hon Medical Adviser, MEA
     
  3. Molly98

    Molly98 Senior Member

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    Great paper @Keith Geraghty, lets hope more and more health practitioners begin to sit up a take notice and question the ineffectiveness of CBT in the treatment of ME/CFS but also question if GET may cause harm to patients and on that basis stop recommending. Thank you for playing such a crucial role in this.
     
  4. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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  5. Countrygirl

    Countrygirl Senior Member

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    UK
  6. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    MEA Review: Geraghty et al. Pacing brings about the greatest positive impact with the least negative reactions | 02 September 2017


    Published in the Journal of Health Psychology, 29 August 2017.

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients’ reports of symptom changes following cognitive behavioural therapy, graded exercise therapy and pacing treatments: Analysis of a primary survey compared with secondary surveys

    Keith Geraghty, Mark Hann, Stoyan Kurtev

    Introduction

    In 2015, the ME Association published results of a large illness management survey that had been conducted over a period of 4 months and had elicited detailed answers about patient experiences of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), graded exercise therapy (GET), and Pacing (PT).

    ‘Cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy are promoted as evidence-based treatments for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. This article explores patients’ symptom responses following these treatments versus pacing therapy, an approach favoured by many sufferers. We analyse data from a large cross-sectional patient survey (n = 1428) and compare our findings with those from comparable patient surveys (n = 16,665), using a mix of descriptive statistics and regression analysis modelling.’
    Dr Keith Geraghty, founder of the ME/CFS research group, has recently published a review comparing the ME Association survey evidence with findings from 10 other similar surveys from other ME/CFS charity organisations to better understand treatment efficacy from the patient’s point of view and try to determine why patient survey responses differ from those reported in clinical trials.

    ⇒ Dr Geraghtyis an Honorary Research Fellow in Population Health, Health Sciences Research and Primary Care, where his work focuses on M.E. and CFS. The ME Association provided funding to help cover the costs of this recent study, and has made a further grantof £25,000 for Dr Geraghty to challenge and review the theoretical basis and clinical application of CBT and GET in the NHS.

    The main findings >>

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...e-least-negative-reactions-02-september-2017/

    Dr Charles Shepherd
    Hon Medical Adviser, MEA
     
  7. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    I'm really pleased to see this paper. A thorough job, highlighting some very important issues.
     
  8. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    And.

    ME Association provide new research grant to Dr Keith Geraghty to examine two controversial ME/CFS treatments recommended by NICE


    ME Association trustees have approved a new research grant that will critically examine the theoretical basis that underlies the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Graded Exercise Therapy (GET) in ME/CFS.


    The £25,000 grant – over two years – has been given to Dr Keith Geraghty at the University of Manchester and will challenge and review the theoretical basis and clinical application of CBT and GET in the NHS.

    Dr Geraghty is an Honorary Research Fellow in Population Health, Health Sciences Research and Primary Care, where his work focuses on ME and CFS.

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...-treatments-recommended-by-nice-13-july-2017/

    CS
     
  9. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    A very balanced and conclusive report. Difficult to argue that GET should be retained. Thank you @Keith Geraghty
     
  10. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

  11. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    A blog on this study.
    https://autodidactauthor.wordpress.com/2017/09/04/get-causes-harm-everyone-knows-that-right/
     
  12. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Thanks to Keith (and the other authors).

    I think I'm more naturally suspicious of survey data than most, but I still liked this. Although I actually liked the introduction, before it got to the survey data, most! It felt a bit like the sign of a new dawn. I have to admit that I glossed over some of the stats... it's late!

    I thought that was interesting as a possible explanation for why survey's conducted by patients tend to get much worse results for CBT/GET than survey's by CBT/GET therapists.

    One little error that actually works unfairly against the paper:

    5% was acutally the median:

     

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