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Maternal Childhood Trauma and Placental-Fetal Stress Physiology

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by MeSci, Dec 5, 2015.

  1. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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  2. SOC

    SOC

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    Oh, puh-leez. :rolleyes:

    I'm not going to bother to dig into this, so I can't say how sound their questionnaire or statistics are. Even assuming both are high quality (which I doubt), correlation is not causation. Don't they teach this basic scientific principle in medical psychology school? IF there is a real correlation between maternal childhood trauma and pCRH, that does not lead to the conclusion that trauma-related stress is transmitted intergenerationally many years after the maternal trauma.

    Do any of our intelligent psych-trained members know what constitutes childhood trauma according to this questionnaire? Is it physical abuse, experience of war, death of parent, or are more common childhood experiences like being bullied, illness, or injury also included?
     
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  3. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    Hopefully some people will be able to access the full text and provide some good analysis, including stats.
     
  4. All I can think of seeing this is the idea in this paper: http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=1211984 combined with known epigenetic transmission issues caused by stress (all I can remember for that one is the two studies regarding stress during male sperm production and pregnancy) http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/121# ; http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v17/n5/full/nn.3695.html#access
    My knowledge is not great, and I must confess that I haven't fully read these papers, and even if I were too, I would not be informed enough to judge them safely. My science education ends at A-Level, with not great results due to repeat absence with illness. I am still interested, but, that doesn't help much.

    Either way, if I am right and they are asserting an Epi-genetic cause at least it's better than pure 'in your head' lines.
     
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  5. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    A common criticism here is that reporting of childhood trauma tends to be subjective and subject to confounding. I have an open mind about it, and there are IMO plausible mechanisms for how such things could occur.

    Another criticism is that some people say that they did not have traumatic childhoods but still have ME. But I don't think that it is being claimed that everyone has the same cause for their illness - just that there may be a significant subgroup in which this is a factor.
     
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  6. Oh I agree that there could be mechanisms, at least as far as my own limited knowledge extends. I was not very clear, I was trying simply to say that all that was put in my mind by the first post was the idea of an epigenetic mechanism.

    I was thinking when I made that post that the copied genes (at thus RNA attachments) at the time of gamete production of one/other or both parent(s), could be influenced by stress, and that the study might be asserting the idea that when the eggs or sperm are 'created' (assuming that the replenishment happened after the traumatic event) that the stress state might thus be heritable, causing mal-expression of certain characters.

    Not sure how relevant what I am talking about there is... but its fun to think about?
     
  7. SOC

    SOC

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    Isn't it true that human eggs are not replenished or created in adulthood? Aren't human females born with all the eggs they're going to have? Sperm are replenished, but not eggs, iirc. So much for maternal stress affecting eggs created after the trauma. Paternal stress might affect sperm, by that logic, but it shouldn't work similarly for the female side of things.

    Or is that outdated information? It's been a while since I was in Biology class. :p
     
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  8. I don't know if it panned out, and my information may be out of date by now, but I think that in 2004/2005 sort of time it was announced that ovaries replenished eggs in most mammals to account for loss, damage, destruction, and natural degradation, making use of stem cells found in the ovary proper. There was some more on it more recently, (2010-2014). I will link articles later on or tomorrow if I can find them, but I can't remember where they were, sorry.

    I do remember though that the original study regarding number of eggs was 1950s and full of errors, but became dogma none the less.
     
  9. SOC

    SOC

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    Wasn't that a single study on mice, so hardly conclusive evidence about mice, much less mammals in general? However, if there are more recent studies I haven't seen (very likely :)), the 2004 research may have been replicated and extended to human studies. Let me know if you find the research. I'd be interested in seeing what more current thinking is.
     
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