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Mastocytosis: Diagnosis, Classification, and Therapy

Discussion in 'Mast Cell Disorders/Mastocytosis' started by nanonug, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    Virginia, USA
  2. MNC

    MNC Senior Member

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    Thanks for this.
     
  3. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Hi nanonug,

    In looking at page 31, I noticed that they didn't recommend treating for h pylori for peptic
    ulcers. Is it possible that this area of medicine has missed that ? Or is this info old ?

    They mentioned treating neuro symptoms with h1s too. What's up with that ?

    Tc .. X
     
  4. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    These would be for H. pylori-negative peptic ulcers, caused by excessive histamine leading to increased stomach acid.

    H1/H2 blockers appear to be "standard practice" for mast cell activation disorders. I suspect this is due to the auto-excitatory nature of histamine on mast cells. However, there might be other reasons I am not aware of.
     
    xchocoholic likes this.
  5. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    I can tell from experimenting with h1 mc meds, including Benadryl, and Klonopin that h1s don't stop my myoclonus / jerking.
    Klonopin nails it tho. So I'm surprised that they'd suggest using mc meds for neuro problems. It is just a chart
    tho. Lol.

    tc .. X
     
  6. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    What I found most interesting was the suggestion of using cromolyn sodium for neuro symptoms. Cromolyn sodium pretty much stays in the gut so I guess the old adage of "it's all in your gut" might old true after all. In my case, there is definitely a very strong correlation between gut and neurological symptoms.
     

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