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MAO A advice or experiences?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by cobain_justinsane, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. cobain_justinsane

    cobain_justinsane

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    Hey all

    I am about to start treating my Methylation Cycle. I am compound Heterozygous for MTHFR and Have several MTR/MTRR mutations. No COMT.

    I deal with anxiety and depression, although it has been pretty good lately, I am just hoping not to aggravate my depression/ anxiety when I start supplementing with Methylfolate/ B12.

    COMT won't be a problem so I am wondering if anyone has any information on the MAO A mutation.

    I have not found much on the MAO A mutation most stuff I can find on MAO deals with the "Warrior Gene."
    Does anyone have any experience with MAO and Methylation or have any information/research on the subject?
    Is MAO even a problem when treating Methylation or is it not much to worry about?

    Thanks a lot for any responses!
     
  2. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    The MAO mutation is an upregulation of the enzyme. This would mean that you haver fewer neurotransmitters available (they are metabolized faster). So this should actually make you more tolerant versus methyl donors.
     
  3. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    I'm heterozygous for MAO A and MTHFR A1298C. I was a melancholy child but as an adult have only had a very few bouts of depression. I wouldn't describe myself as an anxious person.

    Heartfixer says this:
    The one time I was medicated for depression I was given Desyrel, not an SSRI, but it worked beyond belief. I took 1/3 pill each of two night and was 80% better the third day. It is not prescribed for men, though, due to the risk of priapism. This was 1987; it may not be prescribed at all anymore. No one knew the mechanism by which it works.

    My original methylation protocol was 1mg methylfolate and 5 mg. My tryptophan before starting was at 59 (reference range 40-91), so I was at 37% of the normal range. Two months later I tested low for tryptophan (20, half low normal), so I started taking 500 mg/day. At the next test, it dropped to 17 in spite of the supplements, which I did not stop before the test, so I upped it to 1500 mg/day about August of last year. I also upped my B12 at that point. I started wondering if I've had some occasional mild depression, only after a friend asked if I was, but I think a lot of that was circumstantial. (I was having severe issues getting anyone to look at an abnormal medical test result because the endo who read it said it was normal. This past Monday I convinced my primary care, Tuesday I asked him to order an MRI, and yesterday found out that I have a pituitary tumor. I started being elated on Wednesday when I finally got the MRI scheduled, because finally I was going to know, even though I've known since November that a tumor was statistically the most probably cause of my symptoms. So far, I'm happier knowing than not. Well, that is, after I fainted twice and then threw up. Was this depression, then, or frustration? I'm voting for frustration.)

    So , what I did (all directed by my nurse practitioner except upping the dose to 1500) is opposite what heartfixer says. But in general, I think its working. My happiness generally bounces back as long as I'm not dealing with the headache or low cortisol symptoms.

    What I think is that we're each a whole package, and a whole different package. What works for you may not be the same as what works for me. But you asked for experience and this is mine.
     
  4. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Hi Cobain. I've lived with the "warrior" effects of MAO, or rather the "psychopath gene" or "violence gene", as labelled in a TED talk. I always thought my over-reactivity and angry outbursts were due to family conditioning. My over-reactivity has been helped by a number of things over the past couple years. Removing gluten and dairy, adding the correct minerals and TMG, adding v low dose lithium, as suggested by Yasko. I've used 4 of Yasko's RNA drops: bowel inflammation, CBS, leaky gut, and MAO. After 4-6 months, it's the MAO I continue to self-test + for 5 drops/day. The others I'm now using a drop 2x week, the CBS 2 drops when I eat meat in meal.

    It took me about a year from getting my genetic results to understand that MAO had something to do w/ histamines. This has been v significant. I now use a range of things to compensate for histamines, plus a low histamine diet. There's a lot of info at lowhistaminechef.com. Improving methylation certainly improves the ability to deal w/ histamines. However, I now understand that this will likely not just go away when I get everything right. It might be less severe. Presently I'm less distressed by histamine reactions than I've been for the decade of my illness. Best to you, ahmo
     
  5. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    @adreno , how did you find out the MAO was an upregulation? I had understood that "serotonin metabolism is adversely affected" meant that it wasn't metabolized well, a downregulation. I'm not at all sure I understood it right, though.
     
  6. cobain_justinsane

    cobain_justinsane

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    I did read in another forum on here that people may have thought it could be a possible up regulation but didn't really give any information backing it up. I've also seen the Yasko information but it doesn't really give a cleat cut explanation of what happens.

    For example, we understand that:
    - Mthfr is a down regulation. Folate metabolism is impaired and the methylation cycle is compromised.
    -COMT is a down regulation, and certain neurotransmitters are metabolized at a slower rate causing them to accumulate and cause potential negative effects (anxiety, insomnia, irritability etc.)


    Yet I can not seem to find a good explanation as to what the MAO A mutation really does, what the effects are, and if it is really a cause for concern when treating the methylation cycle with methylfolate/B12.
     
  7. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    I can't remember anymore. I would think it has become common knowledge on this forum by now. Sadly, quite a few of Yaskos claims have been debunked here. You are gonna have to read some of the threads here.
     
  8. Adster

    Adster Senior Member

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    helen1 likes this.
  9. cobain_justinsane

    cobain_justinsane

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    Has anyone experiences any mood swings or high anxiety that you believe you could contribute to MAO or do most feel it's realitivly benign when takin methyl supplements?
     
  10. WoolPippi

    WoolPippi Senior Member

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    yes. Many. All the time. Also before I got ill.
    I manage it with Progesterone and Valerian, both soothing supplements. I also need to take it slow on the Methylation Protocol because anxiety and moodswings will bubble up like mad.

    It is my feeling that my brain chemistry is fairly sensitive. Small things will upset it (synthetic vanilla; garlic; high blood sugar; stress; worries)
    I blame MAO A for not getting rid of the excitatory neurotransmitters in a normal rate. It takes typically 1.5 to 2 hours for my brain to quiet down. (Exercise might speed this up.)
    I think other things are involved too (VDR for example)(gut health)(personal signature of how many of which neurotransmitters are made, I myself am fairly high in serotonin so am a happy person, when not stressed or anxious or messed up.)

    one thing that is confirmed to me time and time again is that the high anxiety and the mood swings (the desperation, the crying, the desolation and the hyper moods) are symptoms. They are not me. They fleet, if I give it time.
     
  11. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    This vid might give you some insights. MAO creates histamine problems, inability to detox histamines. Dr. Theoharides discusses what's happening in the brain w/ histamines, inflammation. During my current coffee enema regimen I've discovered that detox floods me w/ histamines. Now that I immediately take my anti-histamine supps (rutin, royal jelly, quercetin), I no longer feel a toxic wreck after the procedures. I would have thought this was caused by caffeine, but no, it's histamines.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9QbZp3WcC1Q
     
    WoolPippi and Adster like this.
  12. Adster

    Adster Senior Member

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    @ahmo - thanks for this video, I'm half way through it. I see you use quercetin - do you know if the fact that it's potentially a MAO-A inhibitor an issue?
     
    Gondwanaland likes this.
  13. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Hey Adster, I didn't know that about quercetin. I'll look it up. It's recommended by various sources, including Amy Yasko. I do know that when I self-test for supps after these enemas, my body wants extra royal jelly and rutin, but only the one quercetin I take w/ my breakfast.
     
  14. musicchick581

    musicchick581 Senior Member

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    I have MAO A ++ and have moodswings, irritability, random sadness, and have had panic attacks daily and anxiety for 7 years. I'm honestly not sure what to do anymore. I've been on 5htp, macuna, evening primrose oil, lithium orotate 5 mg, and other things that my doc has used to stabalize my neurotransmitters. Last urine test last year before I stopped almost all of it, my dopamine and seratonin were high, so I know it was working, just not helping in the way I needed it. I'm going to Mensah Medical in a few weeks so hopefully they can help there.
     
  15. lnester7

    lnester7 Seven

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    For some reason my Hypothyroid medicine took care of the mood swings.
     
  16. musicchick581

    musicchick581 Senior Member

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    Is MAO A an upregulation or downregulation? I've seen both. What is a reputable site since Yasko obviously isnt?
     
  17. rayco

    rayco

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    MAO ++ will be red colored on Yasko or mthfrsupport.com report and will be the TT........this is the slow version. The GG green color is the sped up version. Prometheus reports this also.

    Dr. Rosenberg now also reports this

    This was a huge find! It basically proves that anyone with MAO-A rs6323 +/- or +/+ for the T allele has slowed activity of the enzyme (if you don’t have a G allele, then your MAO-A is slowed down). This means conversely that those with MAO-A rs6323 -/- on the variant report have the high activity enzyme – aka the normal enzyme and the G/G genotype
     
  18. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    You are right that the G allele is the high activity variant. However, the T allele is not slowed down, it's the normal variant. It means your MAO A has normal activity. See:http://snpedia.com/index.php/Rs6323

    I don't know why Yasko et al. has this as a risk allele. In all studies, the G allele is the risk allele.
     
  19. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    @adreno, I don't get it. I have MAO A ++, TT, and there are aspects of this, particularly histamines, if not the 'violence gene' part that have really messed up my life.:confused:
     
  20. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    How can you know that this specific SNP is to blame for your messed up life? That's nonsense.
     
    Valentijn likes this.

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