The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Magnesium - what's best kind to take

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by langdale, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. langdale

    langdale

    Messages:
    13
    Likes:
    2
    United Kingdom
    For those trying methylation, anyone have an opinion on best type magnesium. I see citrate and glycinate mentioned a lot. Have often wondered whether citrate is not good for me, tastes a bit bitter.
     
  2. Eastman

    Eastman Senior Member

    Messages:
    258
    Likes:
    206
    I use both the citrate and glycinate forms, the former as the Natural Calm powder, so it's not bitter at all.
     
  3. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

    Messages:
    857
    Likes:
    1,366
    Pacific Northwest
    Natural Calm has arsenic in it:

    https://labdoor.com/article/labdoors-statement-natural-vitality-calm

    So do many other magnesium supplements. It seems to be naturally occurring with magnesium so its wise to check out your magnesium product before buying. Arsenic can stop ATP production, not a good thing.

    I take Designs for Health magnesium malate or the Seeking Health Magnesium Plus, which is magnesium lysinate glycinate chelate plus magnesium malate. Malate is used in the Krebs cycle and the glycinate can promote sleep (and be used in glutathione production).
     
    Jennifer J, langdale and Eastman like this.
  4. Eastman

    Eastman Senior Member

    Messages:
    258
    Likes:
    206
    Thanks, that's good to know. Unfortunately, it's not always easy to find out exactly what toxic materials are in the supplements sold.
     
  5. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes:
    5,053
    Canada
    Here is some information previously posted by seunderwood here on PR:
    Magnesium citrate - is the most popular magnesium supplement, probably because it is inexpensive and easily absorbed. Citric acid is a mild laxitive. It is a good choice for those with rectal or colon problems, but unsuitable for those with loose bowels.

    Magnesium taurate - is the best choice of magnesium for people with cardiovascular issues, it is known to prevent arrhythmias and guard the heart from damage caused by heart attacks. It is easily absorbed and contains no laxative properties.

    Magnesium malate is a fantastic choice for people suffering from fatigue, since malic acid - a natural fruit acid present in most cells in the body - is a vital component of enzymes that play a key role in ATP synthesis and energy production. Magnesium malate is highly soluable.

    Magnesium glucinate - is one of the most bioavailable and absorbable forms of magnesium and less likley to cause diarrhea. It is the safest for long-term deficiency.

    Magnesium chloride - has an impressive absorption rate and is the best form of magnesium to take for detoxing the cells and tissues. Also, chloride aids kidney function and can boost a sluggish metabolism.

    Magnesium Carbonate - is a bioavailable form of magnesium that actually turns into chloride when it mixes with hydrochloric acid in our stomach. It is a good choice for people suffering from indigestion and reflux, since it contains antacid properties.

    Worse forms of magnesium :

    Magnesium oxide - is non-chelated and possesses a poor absorption rate compared to those listed above.

    Magnesium sulfate - also called Epsom salts, is a fantastic constipation aid BUT an unsafe source of dietary magnesium since over dosing is easy.

    Magnesium glutamate and aspartate - Avoid these two forms completely. Glutamic acid and asparatic acid are componets of the dangerous artificial sweetner aspartame, and both of them become neurotoxic when bound to other amino acids.
     
    Jennifer J, langdale and Learner1 like this.
  6. Vojta

    Vojta Senior Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes:
    253
    Czech Republic
    Is magnesium orotate good? It's the best I can buy locally. No side effects so far.
     
  7. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes:
    5,053
    Canada
    This article by Consumer Lab has some interesting negative things to say about magnesium orotate:

    "In fact, magnesium orotate probably isn't the best choice as a magnesium supplement for preventing or treating magnesium deficiency because it doesn't appear to offer an advantage over others and it can cost up to 9 times more than other magnesium products."

    "Magnesium orotate is not the best choice as a magnesium supplement and despite preliminary evidence of a benefit for people with heart disease, there is also evidence suggesting a potential safety concern at around the high dosage used for that purpose. Until more is known about the potential benefits and risks, it may be best not to use magnesium orotate."

    @Vojta what other forms can you get locally? Are you able to order a better form online?
     
    langdale likes this.
  8. langdale

    langdale

    Messages:
    13
    Likes:
    2
    United Kingdom
    Thanks everyone. The citrate I was referring to as bitter is zinc citrate, maybe not really bitter but more like strong and odd tasting. But nearly all supplements produce horrible taste in mouth hours after taking them not because any is left in my mouth (some are capsules swallowed) but because I can't detox them.

    I've got a new bottle of Vridian magnesium citrate but don't know anything about that brand. Thanks for the advice re. arsenic @Learner1 Wanted pure powder without fillers and there isn't much choice here in UK.
     
  9. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

    Messages:
    825
    Likes:
    1,973
  10. Vojta

    Vojta Senior Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes:
    253
    Czech Republic
    Only oxide or lactat are in pharmacies here. I will buy something with other stuff when I find some good online EU pharmacy. But Im not sure which magnesium is best for me anyway. I have problem with acidity. Which one would be least acidic?

    I read that about orotic acid that doses over 7000mg could be bad but I take 500mg day now.
     
  11. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet

    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes:
    7,561
    My own opinion is that there is a lot of "confusing" advice relating to magnesium. This seems to be driven by the large number of quack advocates who spout what is quite frankly a load of rubbish. It seems strange that there are many alternative practioners advising that the most expensive forms are the best when magnesium is one of the most available elements on the planet. It's also strange that these people also conveniently sell the so called better forms?

    I use magnesium oxide deliberately because it has slow release (2x400mg orally per day), but I also make my own magnesium "oil" which is a 50% solution of magnesium chloride and give myself 20 sprays on the legs in the morning and another 20 before bed. I also top up with Epsom salt baths (600g) twice per week.

    I also top up during the day with a few high magnesium snacks (pumpkin seeds, almonds, dark chocolate).

    The magnesium oil is definitely worth a try since it's cheap to make and you will know whether it's working or not quite quickly.
     
    Gondwanaland, langdale and PatJ like this.
  12. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

    Messages:
    857
    Likes:
    1,366
    Pacific Northwest
    Good thing that's just your opinion.

    My sister went and bought magnesium oxide instead of magnesium glycinate by mistake and ended up in the ER with severe intestinal cramping, pain, and diarrhea.

    I've found the different versions do different things while all do provide magnesium.
     
    Tammy likes this.
  13. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet

    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes:
    7,561
     
  14. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

    Messages:
    825
    Likes:
    1,973
    I'm not sure if you know, but Magnesium Oxide has a 4% absorption rate. It's pretty much only good for making expensive urine. Since you make Mg oil, you might want to just stick with that and not waste time and money on the oxide.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11794633/
     
    langdale, Valentijn and Learner1 like this.
  15. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

    Messages:
    857
    Likes:
    1,366
    Pacific Northwest
    I agree, but my sister didn't have any sense and was blissfully unaware of the differences between magnesium supplements, even though I'd specifically top her to avoid magnesium oxide. :eek:
     
  16. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,510
    Likes:
    3,499
    In my experience the best form of magnesium is very personal and takes some experimentation. I only benefit from magnesium oxide and don't need high doses of it.
     
  17. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

    Messages:
    825
    Likes:
    1,973
    @Vojta , I have tried researching the absorption rate/bioavailability of Lithium Orotate, but I can't find anything conclusive. There is a lot of research on using oral Mg Orotate/Orotic Acid to improve heart health, and for that purpose there is compelling evidence that it makes a big difference, so clearly it is getting absorbed, but I couldn't find anything specific to magnesium absorption.

    I'd probably go with the Orotate over the Lactate form, if those were the only two I had to choose. Can you order Mg online? Do you have Amazon in Czech Republic?

    I try to get this kind of information on pubmed, these are the studies I found:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11076423

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16366126

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9794089

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9794088
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
    langdale and PatJ like this.
  18. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet

    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes:
    7,561
    langdale and Gondwanaland like this.
  19. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

    Messages:
    825
    Likes:
    1,973

    That's really interesting, I've never seen a study showing oxide outperforming any other form, thanks for posting that. It doesn't really seem like a fair comparison, though, because they were using almost twice the amount of elemental magnesium in the oxide form compared to the citrate form.

    Even still, with how low the absorption rate of oxide has been shown elsewhere, that probably wouldn't be enough to completely count for the higher levels found in the oxide group, but it still seems a bit fishy to me. I don't have a science background, so maybe this a valid approach in comparing two different forms of something. I would expect that for a fair comparison they would use equivalent amounts of elemental magnesium with both groups.

    From your link:

    In a randomized, prospective, double-blind, crossover study, 41 (20 women) healthy volunteers [mean age 53±8 (range 31-75) years] received either magnesium oxide monohydrate tablets (520 mg/day of elemental magnesium) or magnesium citrate tablets (295.8 mg/day of elemental magnesium) for one month (phase 1), followed by a four-week wash-out period, and then crossover treatment for one month (phase 2).

    EDIT: I'm not trying to argue about which form of magnesium is best. If you have a personal reason for using Mg oxide, say you've tested it in isolation and it works well for you, or it's the only form available to you, etc...then by all means keep using it. Having myself wasted tons of money on supplements, I'm just trying to point out that since many sources and studies agree oxide is an inferior poorly absorbed form, it might not be worth using.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
    langdale and Gondwanaland like this.
  20. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

    Messages:
    492
    Likes:
    547
    Austria
    langdale and arewenearlythereyet like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page