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Lyndonville news - mitochondrial dysfunction

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by justy, May 27, 2011.

  1. justy

    justy Donate Advocate Demonstrate

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    Hi saw this today and couldnt find it posted here.

    "This edition of the Lyndonville News is directed once again toward the mitochondrial problems which underlie the energy envelope of ME/CFS. Whatever is the cause of ME/CFS results in poor mitochondrial functioning and reduced energy output. Drs. Norman Booth, Sarah Myhill and John McLaren-Howard have been very kind as to write a clarification of the paper we will discuss, and an update of their own work. I feel that it is at the cutting edge. First lets put the energy production problems in perspective"

    http://www.davidsbell.com/index.htm#news
     
  2. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Thanks for posting justy - in this very important area of research. Good to see Dr Myhill there too.
     
  3. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Thanks, justy. Mito dysfunction is indeed a very important aspect of ME/CFS. The work of Booth, Myhill and McLaren-Howard really shows the significance of it in terms of the degree of disability.

    My own view is that the mito dysfunction in ME/CFS is a direct result of the vicious circle that involves chronic glutathione depletion and a partial methylation cycle block. This connection flows from known biochemistry. Also, the fact that treating to lift this partial block causes an increase in energy as evaluated by patients supports this view, in my opinion.

    I don't agree with Vermeulen et al. that oxygen transport is the fundamental problem. I think that they have made some incorrect assumptions in their analysis. But more study of that would be helpful to really nail it down, in my opinion.

    Best regards,

    Rich
     
  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Hi, I have only made a first pass attempt at understanding this research, I am too tired to do more but it is clear I may have to reread it several times.

    What is important is they found a decrease in ATP transfer across the mitochondria, if I understood it correctly. For some reason we the mitochondria are not making the ATP available, or not receiving the ADP necessary to make more.

    This has almost nothing to do with oxygen utilization directly, its about ATP/ADP and what is happening with it. I hope to say more when I am rested and can read it properly.

    Bye
    Alex
     
  5. Hope123

    Hope123 Senior Member

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    The Vermeulen paper is fantastic although they only have a small sample size of 15 and a larger group of subjects {like for all CFS studies} would be great. The basic science stuff is complicated and I will have to slowly read Myhill's response but one thing that does stick out for me is response to treatment. That is, if the folks in the Montoya Valcyte studies and the Norway Rituximab studies have the same or similar CFS as what many people have (and they might not because there might indeed be subsets), mitochondrial dysfunction would not strike me as the key problem because neither of these drugs affect mitochondrial directly as far as I know. One is an antiviral and another is a B-cell directed drug. If mitochondrial dysfunction were at the bottom of this illness, I would not have expected these drugs to have the effect they do.
     
  6. justy

    justy Donate Advocate Demonstrate

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    Thanks Rich for your reply. I'm going to se Dr Myhill this week (for an appointment) and am hoping to discuss the methylation cycle block with her, i have held off till now aas i havent been able to find a GP to monitor my progress. I have had the mito function test at Acumen labs and my results where textbook. This research tlked about above was particulry interesting to me (i only have a limited grasp) as it is in the transport across the membrnes that i had the most problems and avery significnt blockage of translocator protein, whilst my ATP production was only borderline low -yet i am very sick at about 30% functioning.
    I stumbled across a site today (when researching ptosis) about mitochondrial myopathies and i was pretty shocked at how clearly my symptoms matched those discussed. Im also not sure that the mito dysfunction is causal or happens later but the page is worth a look.
    http://www.mdausa.org/publications/mitochondrial_myopathies.html
     
  7. justy

    justy Donate Advocate Demonstrate

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  8. warriorseekspeace

    warriorseekspeace

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    Thanks to all you warriors for doing the finding, reading, and posting, and explaining. I just can't seem to get my brain working well enough for that much complex information.
    WarriorSeeksPeace
     

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