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Loy et al: Effect of Acute Exercise on Fatigue in People with ME/CFS/SEID

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by mango, May 19, 2016.

  1. mango

    mango Senior Member

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    Effect of Acute Exercise on Fatigue in People with ME/CFS/SEID: A Meta-analysis.

    Loy BD
    1, O'Connor PJ, Dishman RK.

    Author information
    1 Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    2 Department of Kinesiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 May 17. [Epub ahead of print]

    Abstract

    PURPOSE:
    A prominent symptom of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, or Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (ME/CFS/SEID) is persistent fatigue that is worsened by physical exertion. Here the population effect of a single bout of exercise on fatigue symptoms in people with ME/CFS/SEID was estimated and effect moderators were identified.

    METHODS:
    Google Scholar was systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles published between February 1991 and May 2015. Studies were included where people diagnosed with ME/CFS/SEID and matched control participants completed a single bout of exercise and fatigue self-reports were obtained before and after exercise. Fatigue means, standard deviations, and sample sizes were extracted to calculate effect sizes and the 95% CI. Effects were pooled using a random-effects model and corrected for small-sample bias to generate mean [INCREMENT]. Multi-level regression modeling adjusted for nesting of effects within studies. Moderators identified a priori were diagnostic criteria, fibromyalgia comorbidity, exercise factors (intensity, duration, type) and measurement factors.

    RESULTS:
    Seven studies examining 159 people with ME/CFS/SEID met inclusion criteria, and 47 fatigue effects were derived. The mean fatigue effect was [INCREMENT] = 0.73 (95% CI = 0.24, 1.23). Fatigue increases were larger for people with ME/CFS/SEID when fatigue was measured four or more hours after exercise ended rather than during or immediately after exercise ceased.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    This preliminary evidence indicates that acute exercise increases fatigue in people with ME/CFS/SEID more than in control groups, but effects were heterogeneous between studies. Future studies with no-exercise control groups of people with ME/CFS/SEID are needed to obtain a more precise estimate of the effect of exercise on fatigue in this population.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27187093/
     
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  2. sdmcvicar

    sdmcvicar

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    So it's a review of literature, stating that an inclusion criteria for the CCC is, in fact, present in the ME/CFS population? But that it's difficult to replicate the results with a single acute bout of exercise?

    Great, thanks guys... did you perchance read Keller et al. 2014 about using a 2-day CPET to improve repeatability?

    Apparently exhaustive searching of Google scholar prevents one from actually reading all the papers on the subject.
     
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  3. panckage

    panckage Senior Member

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    Vancouver, BC
    Well it's a Meta-analysis. They can't mera-analyze trials unless they have already been done. Are you trying to say there are 2 day CPET studies that could have been included in the analysis but were overlooked?
     
  4. sdmcvicar

    sdmcvicar

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    No, simply that their conclusion that future fatigue trials should be performed with additional control groups is a poor recommendation, especially given the state of funding for CFS/ME, and that there are papers well within their search parameters that should have been considered as they performed the analysis and wrote the paper. While they could have included the two-day CPET as a separate analysis to show that it was more repeatable, and compared heterogeneity results with the two different approaches, it probably would have been outside the scope of their meta-analysis.
     
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  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Valentijn likes this.
  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    It is frustrating that the authors take at face value claims that exercise programmes reduce fatigue in CFS.
     
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  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I thought this was a bit of a waste of time as probably all of the studies would have had fibromyalgia cases if everyone had been assessed. If they had broken them down by the percentage of people with fibromyalgia that might have been a bit more interesting.
     
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  8. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Invisible Woman likes this.
  9. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  10. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    It's a pity they only looked at fatigue.
     
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