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Looking for source for Japanese Knotweed

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by maryb, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I want to try this herb. I was looking on the website Stephen Buhner recommends but it seems they don't do the tincture any longer? I don't want to start with capsules really but may have to.
    Woodlands essences don't ship to the UK - damn...

    Anyone tried a product they would recommend?
     
  2. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    @maryb The herbalist I saw today near Brighton is going to put together quite a lot of herbs for me to start helping my IS and to kill the borrelia and she is going to get me some Japanese Knotweed and send it to me but not sure where she gets it from and what form it will be. The other herbs will be in a tincture. I will be seeing her again in a month's time as a follow up. Do you want me to email her as to whether there is a source you could buy from here in the UK? I haven't a clue where she buys her herbs from.

    Obviously I am not sure how she would feel about this because she might not be too keen on self medication, I don't know. BTW She was excellent and I felt I was on the same wavelength with her. She said it would probably take around 2 years (at least that is what Buhner says I think).

    Pam
     
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Its a weed, it grows like a weed. I am guessing its not hard to grow. However I only know of one person who is thinking of doing that. I also have no idea where to buy it.
     
  4. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    @bertiedog
    I would be grateful if she could give any info. thanks. She sounds very positive, just what you need to hear.
    @alex3619
    I'm sure its probably easy to make into a tincture - if I had the energy, its a notifiable weed here in the UK, maybe that's why its hard to get, the minister responsible probably thinks you could grow it from the herbal formula:) we know they don't have much between the ears.
     
  5. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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  6. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    @minkeygirl
    thanks - I was just looking at Buhner's recommended suppliers, iherb has the gaiaherb one, but unfortunately not sure if its the whole root which he specifies it should be:(
     
  7. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    I think there was an email address for Gaia. You can email them and ask. I got some Gaia stuff that shipped from India I think so you might be able to get it easily.
     
  8. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    minkeygirl likes this.
  9. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    HI @maryb,

    I checked out Japanese Knotweed a few weeks ago, and it's now sort of a big new protocol for me. I did a fair amount of research, including finding some YouTube videos. THIS VIDEO was made by an herbalist in Maine, who apparently has used it successfully in his practice to treat Lyme.

    It grows prodigiously in England and the US, and I was able to find some here in Southern Oregon. So far I've only used the leaves, which I've put in smoothies. I also dry the leaves and use it as a tea, and now drink about a quart (liter) of it every day. The main medicinal value is in the roots however, and I've not yet found out the best time of year to harvest the roots. But just using the leaves so far has been definitely positive for me. I'd also say quite subtle, with a feel of gentle support for my entire system, perhaps a bit like a small amount of tea, without any buzz.

    A couple specific things I've noticed since taking it: It seems to have "normalized" my appetite. I've often felt I have somewhat of an "abnormal" appetite, where I sometimes feels a need to eat, though part of me doesn't want to. This has mostly gone away since drinking the tea. I've also noticed minor (but chronic) pains in my GI tract has gotten noticeably better. So, two GI symptoms noticeably improved from drinking the tea.

    I've also noticed a better stamina when going outside the house. Though I think the tea is responsible for at least part of this, I think it's also a result of my ongoing liposomal Vitamin C protocol, which I continue to increase gradually (now up to 12g/day). I've also been adding 4 oz. of aloe vera juice to my tea as well. Something about this combination is definitely doing some good things for me.

    I would encourage you to follow up on your interest in Japanese Knotweed. The more I read and research, and the more I experiment with my body, the more enthusiastic I become. I'm very much looking forward to trying the roots.

    Best, Wayne

    P.S. From my research, it appears this can be a very powerful herb. The leaves of the plant may be a gentler form of taking this herb, which may be a good starting point for pwME/CFS.

    @alex3619
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2014
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  10. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    One other item that might be pertinent to the benefits I feel I've gotten from the JKnotweed tea. In addition to the protocols that I mentioned, I've also gotten into the habit of eating a small raw potato each day (resistant starch). It gave me a good amount of GI upset in the beginning, but as I kept up with it, it came to agree with me quite well. One other GI symptom that improved, though I don't know how much was from the JK and how much was from the resistant starch.
     
  11. Hanna

    Hanna Senior Member

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    @maryb - I have the same problem as you, as I live in the Middle-East.
    Some Lyme-fellow recommended on a French Lyme forum this brand : I have ordered it recently from iHerbs, but hasn't tried it yet...
    Cardiovascular Research Ltd., Resveratrol, 60 Capsules
    Resveratrol (trans)
    From 200 mg Polygonum cuspidatum root extract, standardized to 50% trans-resveratrol100 mg
    Other Ingredients
    Gelatin, silicon dioxide

    I liked the fact that it was not some blend...
    But again, I have no experience with it. I would have prefered a tincture though.
     
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  12. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    @maryb I have emailed my herbalist this morning and asked if she knows where in the UK it can be purchased. Will let you know. She was going to get some for me I remember her saying in addition to the other herbs she will put together.

    Pam
     
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  13. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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  14. N.A.Wright

    N.A.Wright Guest

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    Fallopia japonica is a harmful introduction and should not be grown outside its native range. In the UK it is covered by legislation https://www.gov.uk/japanese-knotweed-giant-hogweed-and-other-invasive-plants, a number of US states have legislation related Japanese Knotweed as a noxious plant, it’s classed as an unwanted organism in New Zealand and considered as a potentially serious environmental in at least some parts of Australia. In many locations the plant is uncontrollable by normal horticultural practices, anyone wanting Japanese Knotweed products should stick to sourcing from regulated producers.
     
  15. Iquitos

    Iquitos Senior Member

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    http://www.1stchineseherbs.com/hu_zhang.html
    This is available in several forms but not a tincture. It's not hard to make a tincture, though, per Steven Bruhner's instructions.

    Add 1 part dry herb to 5 parts liquid.
    The liquid should be half alcohol and half water. (I use grain alcohol, one called GemClear, and distilled water.)

    Let macerate for several days to a week, then strain out the solids and bottle your tincture.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2014
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  16. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Just ran across this snippet about resveratrol (concentrated in Japanese Knotweed roots) from some old notes.
     
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  17. RosieBee

    RosieBee Senior Member

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    Paradise brand is recommended by Stephen Buhner and you can get this sent to UK from iHerb.
     
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  18. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    This is one of my favorite reads on Japanese Knotweed.

    [​IMG]

    Japanese Knotweed in the Treatment of Lyme Disease.
    (Polygonum cuspidatum)

    Lisl Meredith Huebner, Dipl.CH (NCCAOM), RH (AHG), CMA

    Anyone who is even slightly familiar with Japanese Knotweed knows that it is tenacious and difficult to eradicate. The plants seem rather intelligent, adapting to the various methods of “warfare” thrown at them. Even small pieces of root can repopulate quickly, taking full advantage of suitable circumstances to run rampant.

    Anyone who is even slightly familiar with Lyme disease knows that it is tenacious and extremely difficult to treat. The spirochetes that cause it seem rather intelligent, adapting to the various methods of “warfare” thrown at them. Even small populations can survive for long periods of time in an imperfect environment, just biding their time until conditions improve and will take full advantage of suitable circumstances to run rampant throughout their host. Oh dear. There seems to be striking similarities between these two entirely different species. I point this out to illustrate that the qualities inherent in Japanese Knotweed are precisely the factors needed to combat the obstinate and frequently debilitating spirochetes that cause Lyme disease.

    You could refer to the overall personality of Knotweed as a “doctrine of signatures” of sorts; the survival traits natural to this plant are powerful indicators of the benefits that we may utilize in our quest for health, particularly when confronted with a powerful adversary like Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete, a microorganism carried by ticks and other biting insects such as mosquitoes, biting flies, mites and fleas. A spirochete is a gram-negative bacterium that “screws” itself into tissue -particularly collagen- and can encapsulate quickly under adverse conditions, going dormant until its environment becomes more hospitable. Spirochetes are notably clever, and easily adapt to elude antibiotics; they can then exchange resistance information within their community and to other co-infections, making treatment ever more difficult. A close cousin of this spirochete is one that causes syphilis, and consequently there is strong evidence that Lyme can be transmitted sexually as well as through mother’s milk, saliva and in utero.

    Japanese Knotweed is a native of Asia, but was introduced in Britain in the nineteenth century. The clones introduced in Europe reproduce through their rhizomes, not via seeds so all the plants there (and likely here in the US also) are in essence, one giant female. Known as the King of Weeds (Let’s change that to Queen, shall we?), the hardy Japanese Knotweed is the best known source of resveratrol and trans-resveratrol, naturally occurring compounds that are antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anti-spirochetal and have a myriad of other health benefits as well. Plants like Knotweed produce resveratrol in order to combat disease and to become more tolerant to environmental extremes.

    Not long ago, red grape skins were the primary source of resveratrol in supplements, and the impetus behind the theory of the “French Paradox” which implied that the generous inclusion of red wine with a high fat diet prevented heart disease. Research has found that Polygonum cuspidatum, abundant and readily available, contains much more concentrated resveratrol and trans-resveratrol than grapes, making Knotweed a much preferred commercial source of this valuable antioxidant. It’s unlikely that the French predilection for pinot noir will be replaced by Knotweed anytime soon, so don’t throw away your wine glasses just yet. Resveratrol can help lower cholesterol and regulate blood pressure and has shown promise for the treatment of certain cancers, breast cancer in particular; as a complimentary treatment it can raise white blood cell levels during chemotherapy and radiation. During menopause and senior years, resveratrol can help protect bone density levels and increase the mineral content in bone tissue.

    Japanese Knotweed is effective against a variety of organisms including the Lyme co-infection bartonella, leptospira, gonorrhea, and meningitis; its strong antifungal qualities make it especially inhibitive toward Candida albicans. It is also a powerful antiviral agent, effective in the treatment of herpes, ECHO viruses and various strains of influenza such as SARS and Asian flu (which in my opinion, is a far more attractive option than vaccinations of questionable origin). What makes Knotweed so valuable when it comes to treating Lyme disease is that it not only inhibits the spirochetes, it is also markedly anti-inflammatory, reducing joint pain, swelling and fever. The anti-inflammatory effect helps to regulate the immune system and prevents it from being over burdened; its modulating effect makes it useful for many autoimmune ailments. Knotweed supports the central nervous system and protects the heart, making it especially valuable in the treatment of Lyme-related carditis. Lyme disease affects more than the joints; symptoms can range from pronounced fatigue, fever and aches to foggy thinking, memory lapses, muscular spasms, rashes and vision problems. The spirochetes that cause Lyme make a meal of collagen tissue, and their favorite restaurants include your joints, skin, eyes and brain. Knotweed has a strong ability to protect those tender areas, stimulating microcirculation and directing other herbs to otherwise difficult to treat regions of the body.

    The constituents in Knotweed are also able to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), protecting delicate cerebral tissue and harmonizing blood flow. Regular supplementation of Polygonum cuspidatum during or after an active infection will help sharpen mental function and relieve pain throughout the body. During effective treatment of Lyme disease, patients frequently experience what is known as a Herxheimer reaction. A “Herx” response is a healing crisis of exacerbated overall symptoms; fevers spike, joint pain becomes more pronounced, fatigue may increase –basically the patient feels absolutely awful.

    The reason for the aggravated symptoms is a massive die-off of the pathogenic spirochetes creating a high volume of toxicity in the blood. Believe it or not, this is a good sign: the treatment is working. It doesn’t seem like good news to anyone experiencing it however, and this is another instance where Japanese Knotweed can come to the rescue by reducing Herx symptoms and aiding in systemic detoxification. Lyme expert and Master Herbalist Stephen Harrod Buhner recommends a core protocol of four to five herbs in the treatment of Lyme disease: Japanese Knotweed, Andrographis, Cat’s Claw, Smilax and Astragalus. Since the publication of his book,Healing Lyme in 2005, thousands of people have reported significant improvement if not complete relief from their Lyme symptoms using this basic protocol. Treatment works best when an experienced herbalist adjusts their healing strategy according to each individual’s needs and be aware that Knotweed is contraindicated with pregnancy and blood-thinning medications.

    Since Japanese Knotweed is so rampant, it is easy to find and harvest without concern for upsetting delicate ecological balance, but avoid areas where the ground may be contaminated such as roadsides and polluted streambeds. Dig roots up in the autumn after the above ground plant begins to die back and before the ground freezes or in the spring after the earth thaws and small shoots resembling asparagus begin to emerge. The root mass is woody and extremely solid; after some dedicated scrubbing, I find that hacking chunks off with a hatchet and smashing them with a hammer breaks the rhizome into manageable pieces that I can then decoct in water. Please don’t hurt yourself in the process of procuring your medicine, but if you do, rest assured… Knotweed is even helpful for traumatic injury! The core belief I’ve held since I was a child echoes the Indian theory of existence as stated by Mourning Dove Salish,“...everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission…”

    I agree with Buhner when he speculates that the link between a so-called invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed and its handy availability in the presence of emerging persistent diseases like Lyme, West Nile, exotic flu and AIDS suggests that Gaia has once again planned for everything. An intelligence far greater than our own possesses the Vision to create balance on a scale of time and space that we cannot yet grasp; it is in our best interest to place our faith and trust in the Earth once more.
    ..............................................................................


    I copied the above from THIS WEBSITE.
     
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  19. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    That's it. Most advertised resveratrol is from Japanese Knotweed.
     
  20. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    I have had to come off it having taken 9 capsules daily for 4 months. Turns out it is a potent vasodilator and therefore it has given me horrendous migraines. Cats Claw is the same so the 2 together made me feel suicidal.

    Thankfully having stopped them 2 days ago my head is getting back to normal.

    I am going to have to stick to the Cowden protocol because I have been assured by them that their herbals are not vasodilators.

    Very disappointing.

    Pam
     
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