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Longitudinal analysis of immune abnormalities in varying severities of CFS/ME patients

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Bob, Sep 15, 2015.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    Full text available.

    Longitudinal analysis of immune abnormalities in varying severities of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis patients
    Sharni Lee Hardcastle, Ekua Weba Brenu, Samantha Johnston, Thao Nguyen, Teilah Huth,Sandra Ramos, Donald Staines and Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik
    National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, Griffith University.
    Journal of Translational Medicine 2015, 13:299
    Published: 14 September 2015
    doi:10.1186/s12967-015-0653-3
    http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/13/1/299?fmt_view=classic

     
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  2. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    Seems like the immunological research is coming in on a steady rate nowadays. Great!
     
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  3. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Unfortunately it appears that we still don't know what any of these abnormalities really mean.
     
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  4. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    True.. At least the abnormalities makes for hypophesises, that sometimes can be tested, and sometimes from what ive gathered of JE, thats not even possible:p
     
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  5. SOC

    SOC

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    True, but these are big steps towards sorting out what is wrong and what could be done about it.
     
  6. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    True, but it is data, and data generates and tests hypotheses.

    Plus, anything that comes out of Staines' team is worth paying attention to. I have it on very good authority that he is openly dismissive of the CBT/GET model, as both causal explanation and treatment, and is also very confident that we will have a biomarker test within two years, and good treatments within five.

    Yay team! :thumbsup:
     
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  7. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Perhaps that should read:

    and is also very confident that we will have a biomarker test in about two years, and good treatments in about five.
     
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  8. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    Let`s hope phase 3 of the rtx-studies come back positive. Then we may demand to try immunosuppressive treatment. we`ll actually have some treatment options!
     
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  9. Gijs

    Gijs Senior Member

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    I don't believe there will be a test within 2 years. They will find no biomarker in the immune system. I hear that about 20 years now.
     
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  10. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    Natural killer cd56 bright cells could be used with the CCC and possibly use some other type of biomarker/cytokine pattern.
     
  11. Bob

    Bob

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    Yes, progress has been frustratingly slow, but I think things are starting to change now... We have some of the world's highest status scientists on the case now, embarking on multi-million dollar projects, using the most cutting-edge technology. And scientific technology is evolving at an unprecedented pace; I think I recently read a quote by Ron Davis in which he said that many layers of scientific technology are now changing at a transformational pace, and that the public would see the benefits of this in the coming years. (Or words to that effect.) And we have quite a number of research groups looking for biomarkers; e.g. I think the Norwegian ontology group are looking for biomarkers, and a number of other groups are collaborating with them. Hemispherx is about to publish results from a large trial investigating NK cell function in relation to treatment with Ampligen. They seem to be indicating that they have completed an expensive study and that they have some positive results. (It might not be a biomarker for ME - but it might help distinguish potential Ampligen responders from non-responders.) So I think things are finally moving forwards, even if at a frustratingly slow pace.
     
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  12. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    No question about that. Furthermore, the rate of change can crank up (or down) very quickly in the right circumstances, and it is cranking up pretty quickly at the moment, after decades of barely measurable progress.
     
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