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Link between antibiotics, bacterial biofilms and chronic infections found

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Ema, Jul 16, 2014.

  1. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...cedaily (Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily)

    Date:
    July 10, 2014

    Source:
    Oak Crest Institute of Science

    [​IMG]
    The bacteria called non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae are a common cause of infection in the upper respiratory tract. By attaching to surfaces in the body the bacteria form a biofilm. Wu et al. have reported that when the bacteria encounter non-lethal amounts of specific antibiotics they are stimulated to form a bioiflm, a structure that causes chronic infection and which can be highly resistant to antibiotics.
    Credit: Paul Webster, Ph.D.


    Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Oak Crest Institute of Science have discovered the link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and ear infections.

    The study results, published in the current issue of PLOS ONE, illustrate how bacterial biofilms can actually thrive, rather than decrease, when given low doses of antibiotics.

    "This research addresses the long standing issues surrounding chronic ear infections and why some children experience repeated ear infections even after antibiotic treatment," said Paul Webster, PhD, lead author, senior staff scientist at USC and senior faculty at the Oak Crest Institute of Science. "Once the biofilm forms, it becomes stronger with each treatment of antibiotics."

    During the study, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) bacteria a common pathogen of humans was exposed to non-lethal doses of ampicillin, a class of antibiotics commonly used to treat respiratory, sinus and ear infections, or other beta-lactam antibiotics. The dose of the antibiotic was not enough to kill the bacteria which allowed the bacteria to react to the antibiotic by producing glycogen, a complex sugar often used by bacteria as a food source, to produce stronger biofilms when grown in the laboratory.

    Biofilms are highly structured communities of microorganisms that attach to one another and to surfaces. The microorganisms group together and form a slimy, polysaccharide cover. This layer is highly protective for the organisms within it, and when new bacteria are produced they stay within the slimy layer. With the introduction of antibiotic-produced glycogen, the biofilms have an almost endless food source that can be used once antibiotic exposure has ended.

    There are currently no approved treatments for biofilm-related infections. Therefore, bacteria forced into forming stronger biofilms will become more difficult to treat and will cause more severe chronic infections. Adults will suffer protracted lung infections as the bacteria hunker down into their protective slime, and children will have repeated ear infections.

    What may appear to be antibiotic resistance when an infection does not clear up may actually be biofilms at work.

    Webster believes modern medicine needs to find ways of detecting and treating biofilm infections before the bacteria are able to form these protective structures. The difficulties of treating biofilm infections, which can be up to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics, have prompted some physicians to propose a gradual move away from traditional antibiotic treatments and toward non-antibiotic therapies.

    "If antibiotics are to continue to be relevant for treating bacterial infections it is important that their effects on biofilms be explored," says Dr. Webster.

    "One step in this direction would be to develop routine screening methods to test the effects of antibiotics on in vitro formed biofilms."

    Story Source:

    The above story is based on materials provided by Oak Crest Institute of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

    Journal Reference:

    1. Siva Wu, Xiaojin Li, Manjula Gunawardana, Kathleen Maguire, Debbie Guerrero-Given, Christoph Schaudinn, Charles Wang, Marc M. Baum, Paul Webster. Beta- Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Biofilm Formation in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae by Up-Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (7): e99204 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099204
     
    maryb, Helen, Thinktank and 2 others like this.
  2. Hanna

    Hanna Senior Member

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    That stresses the importance of a very well combined ABX plan,user including biofilms busters. Thanks Ema.
     
    maryb and justy like this.
  3. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    More reason to add cyst and biofilm busters to my lyme abx treatment. I'm going to discuss it with my LLMD.
     
    Hanna, maryb and justy like this.
  4. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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    Thanks Ema. I take Best Serrapeptase from Doctor´s Best, (ordered from iherb.com) that is supposed to be dissolved in the intestine for maximum effect.

    Anyone who has a better suggestion?
     
    maryb likes this.
  5. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    NAC is a well-known and effective biofilm buster. Recently, I have also discovered that raw honey is:

    http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/news/20080922/humble-honey-kills-bacteria
     
  6. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    Enzymes directly targeted at biofilms might work even better:

    http://www.iherb.com/Kirkman-Labs-Biofilm-Defense-60-Capsules/58795
     
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  7. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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  8. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    It is, but it's not the only one, so a combination might work better.
     
    Helen likes this.
  9. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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    Yes, my conclusion too after readings. They are quite different. Thanks!!
     
  10. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Hanna and Helen like this.
  11. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I was on a Lyme forum recently. Someone on there posted about taking Serrapeptase with antibiotics, she is doing really well now on this combination, the main point for me was that she started taking Serrapeptase on its own and became more sick, as I did, this just makes the bacteria come out of the biofilm, you need to take antibiotics to kill them at the same time.
    Gosh we're like scientists!!! well maybe a little.....

    So I will have another go with the Serrapeptase, I just couldn't understand why this supplement wouldn't work for me when my husband takes it every morning religiously. Now I do.
     
    ukxmrv, Thinktank and Helen like this.
  12. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    My husband takes the 7th Wave one daily. I read that it doesn't need the enteric coating, (that is made from chemicals?)
     
    Helen likes this.
  13. Hanna

    Hanna Senior Member

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    Other systemic enzymes for Biofilm : PRX (Theramedix), Interphase (Klaire labs), Neprinol, Wobenzym are often quoted as potent for biofilms. MSM is said to prevent adherence of pathogens to membrane, Lactoferrin is often used too.

    If there are some folks who have tested these products and may tell us their impression, it would be helpful. I have been using Wobenzym so far. It is too soon to notice anything though... except the cost which isn't negligeable, since you have to take a lot of pills/day (6-12) to expect some action.
     
    Helen likes this.
  14. xrunner

    xrunner Senior Member

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    Serra is backed by quite a few studies. However, it never worked for me (same brand). It didn't work for lyme nor for my first sinus infection ever last winter. Wobenzym, natto, lactoferrin, didn't work either. The only enzyme that worked for me was Boluoke but it was quite expensive.
    One cheap thing that is in my opinion worth trying is a low-fat diet (see Dr Steven Fry).

    My dad recently got a nasty antibiotic-resistant infection and in hospital they treated him with a combination of iv antibiotics plus heparin for biofilm. So that heparin seems to work.

    For respiratory infections another remedy that worked well for me is this one http://goodhealthnaturally.com/products/immune_support/
    It got rid of my sinus infection for good but it doesn't work for everything.
     

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