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Lightning Process to be Evaluated in Research Study on Children

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Jenny, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch dxrevisionwatch.com

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    Indeed.

    I've just skimmed the Summary of the ME Association's latest meeting of the board of trustees to see whether any further discussion of the LP pilot issue has been noted.

    There's nothing reported that has not been already covered in previous board meeting summaries other than the following:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/?p=3915

    "Summary of MEA Board of Trustees meetings in January 2011

    by tonybritton on January 21, 2011

    [...]

    Following a review of the decision, the NRES upheld the original decision to carry out the trial. We remain unhappy with certain aspects of the review process and will be writing again to the NRES in due course to take up various points relating to the Minutes of the meeting held in December where the ethics committee decision was reviewed.

    A BBC radio discussion from Thursday 11 November about the Lightning Process which included contributions from Professor Leslie Findley, Dr Charles Shepherd and Phil Parker and was chaired by Anne Diamond can be heard on YouTube:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/?p=2921. A transcript is also available on the MEA website.​


    I hope the MEA will be publishing a copy of any follow-up communication to Joan Kirkbride/NRES.

    Suzy
  2. Bob

    Bob

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    Action for ME seem to understand that LP is merely a positive thinking program...
    They also mention that Esther Rantzen's daughter has Coeliac disease...
    In this letter that they sent to The Times...
    http://www.afme.org.uk/news.asp?newsid=1058

    oceanblue likes this.
  3. Wildcat

    Wildcat Senior Member

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    Action for ME regularly place paid-for advertisements for Lightning Process practitioners in AFME's charity magazine 'Interaction', that has been going on for years.


    Action for ME totally deferred to the Reserch Ethics Committees 'judgement' on the ethics of the SMILE Trial (ie the REC approved the Trial).
  4. Wildcat

    Wildcat Senior Member

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    SMILE Trial and Phil Parker Lightning Process Unlawful Advertising.

    Does the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) two decisions against Phil Parkers website advertising for Lightning Process mean that the young participants in Dr Esther Crawleys Lightning Process Smile Trial, and their parents, were mislead by information subsequently judged to be unlawful by the ASA? The young people and their parents were asked to read the Phil Parker Lighting Process website as part of the SMILE Trial Protocol. http://asa.org.uk/ASA-action/Adjudications.aspx?SearchTerms=Phil Parker Group#2


    With reference to the recent post on ME Association FB showing that the ASA had made another decision against The Phil Parker Group (PPG) re its website advertising following a complaint, and that the PPG agreed to change its advertising yet again (18/1/2012), could this have ramifications for the validity of the Lightning Process SMILE Trial?

    .

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    SMILE Protocol 2010
    Assessing the feasibility and acceptability of comparing the Lightning Process? with specialist medical care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Myalgic Encephalopathy (CFS/ME) - pilot Randomised Controlled Trial.
    SMILE Specialist Medical Intervention & Lightning Evaluation

    Interventions:
    Specialist Medical Treatment plus the Lightning Process: In addition to the specialist Medical Care detailed above, young people and their parents will be asked to read the information about the Lightning Process on the website or using information sheets.
    http://www.bristol.ac.uk/ccah/resea...fatigue/smilestudydocuments/smprotv6final.pdf

    .

    .
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    .

    As the young people recruited for the Specialist Medical Care plus the Lightning Process arm of the trial (and their parents) were required to read the information about the Lightning Process on the PPG website (or using information sheets) as a requirement to participating in the trial, could it be that the information they were asked to read was unlawful in ASA terms? As the two complaints against the PPG website advertising were upheld (18/5/2011 and 18/1/2012), could it be argued that information read by the participants (and their parents) on the PPG site was misleading? In addition I wonder if the information in the Information Sheets mentioned in the SMILE Trial Protocol contained any of the material judged unlawful by the ASA?

    .

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    .

    The Phil Parker Group forced to change its website advertising for a second time due to Advertising Standards Authority investigation of another complaint:

    After consideration by the ASA of complaints received, the following companies and organisations agreed to amend or withdraw advertising without the need for a formal investigation:

    Phil Parker Group. 18th January 2012. Internet (on own site)
    Phil Parker Group. 18th May 2011. Internet (on own site)

    http://asa.org.uk/ASA-action/Adjudications.aspx?SearchTerms=Phil Parker Group#2

    .
    Adamskitutu, taniaaust1 and justy like this.
  5. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch dxrevisionwatch.com

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    The following link was posted on Co-Cure, today, by Dr Charles Shepherd, ME Association. Please note that I have no involvement with this complaint by Hampshire Trading Standards.



    http://www.asa.org.uk/ASA-action/Adjudications/2012/8/Phil-Parker-Group-Ltd/SHP_ADJ_158035.aspx

    ASA Adjudication on Phil Parker Group Ltd

    Phil Parker Group Ltd

    River Plate House
    7–11 Finsbury Circus
    London
    EC2M 7DH

    Date:

    22 August 2012
    Media:

    Internet (on own site)
    Sector:

    Health and beauty
    Number of complaints:

    1
    Complaint Ref:

    A11-158035

    Background

    Summary of Council decision:
    Four issues were investigated of which two were Upheld and two were Not upheld.
    Ad

    The website www.lightningprocess.com, for a complementary therapy course known as the Lightning Process, included a landing page that displayed links titled "CFS/ME", "FM/Chronic Pain", "Multiple Sclerosis", "IBS/Digestive issues", "Food/Chemical Intolerances", "Eating Disorders", "Addiction", "Depression", "Phobias/Anxiety/Stress", "Low Self Esteem" and "OCD". Each link directed readers to a page headed "The Phil Parker Lightning Process for [relevant condition]" which featured information including a link to a "Find A Practitioner" page.

    The "CFS/ME" page of the website included the statements "Our survey found that 81.3 %* of clients report that they no longer have the issues they came with by day three of the LP course" and "The Lightning Process is working with the NHS on a feasibility study, please click here for further details, and for other research information click here".

    The Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page stated "Q. Is it similar to any other therapy? A: No, the Lightning Process is a training programme and although it is designed with an expert knowledge of osteopathy, NLP and life coaching, it's not the same as these or any other approaches. The Lightning Process is completely unique ... Q. Why isn't the Lightning Process available on the NHS? A: We have discussed the role of the Lightning Process in the NHS with a number of NHS consultants, and have taken their advice that for the time being its three day format and the particular way it looks at language and health, it's best catered for in a non medical setting. We are looking at ways, including our work with research groups, to make the LP available on the NHS for the future".
    Issue

    Hampshire Trading Standards challenged whether:

    1. the CFS/ME page, and in particular the claim "Our survey found that 81.3%* of clients report that they no longer have the issues they came with by day three of the LP course", misleadingly implied that the Lightning Process could treat or cure CFS/ME;
    2. the claim on the FAQ page that "The Lightning Process is completely unique" could be substantiated; and
    3. the references to the NHS on the website misleadingly implied that the Lightning Process had been endorsed by the NHS.
    4. The ASA challenged whether the pages dedicated to each of the conditions listed on the landing page misleadingly implied that the Lightning Process could treat or cure those conditions.
    CAP Code (Edition 12)

    12.112.23.13.7
    Response

    Phil Parker Group Ltd (Phil Parker Group) said Phil Parker was a statutory registered osteopath, psychotherapist and hypnotherapist and that he was therefore suitably qualified to work with people who suffered from the conditions mentioned. They stated that every Lightning Process (LP) practitioner had been personally trained by Phil Parker and his faculty and that they were all clinical hypnotherapists qualified to work with a range of psycho-therapeutic processes.

    They stated that the LP was a training programme which looked at how individuals could influence their own health and wellbeing. They believed the website made it clear that LP was a non-medical training programme and therefore not a cure or a treatment. They were of the strong opinion that the Code rules on medical treatments should not be applied to the LP, because it did not market or define itself as a medical or health product. They did not believe validation of the effectiveness of a training programme required the same evidence base as medicines or medical treatments. They nevertheless provided evidence which they believed demonstrated that the LP could assist those who suffered from various conditions. They provided a copy of their own "LP Outcome Measures Research" and "LP Snapshot Survey" and abstracts of a number of other studies which they believed were relevant to the application of LP for the conditions listed on the website.

    1. Phil Parker Group said many of their clients considered themselves free of ME after doing the LP course and had been signed off as healthy by their doctor since completing it.

    They said no biochemical marker could be identified as a measure of change for people with CFS/ME and that self-reporting questionnaires were therefore among the most generally accepted ways of documenting change. They said a pilot study conducted with the International Centre For Wellness Research and the LP Outcome Measures Research demonstrated that the LP was an appropriate method for teaching people the tools to assist them with their CFS/ME. They also provided details of surveys conducted by the ME association, the Brighton and Sussex Medical School and the Sussex & Kent CFS/ME Society as well as their own Snapshot Survey. They pointed out that they had included a disclaimer linked to the Snapshot Survey results which stated "Our Snapshot Feedback Survey has been designed as a tool to collect data from clients as to whether they feel they have gained any benefit from attending the Lightning Process course. Although the data was collected from over 1000 people, the results are naturally subjective. Lightning Process practitioners are not medically trained and are therefore relying on client information about their diagnoses, symptoms and issues that they bring to the course".

    2. Phil Parker Group said the LP had been designed solely by Phil Parker. They said he had no direct knowledge of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or graded exercise therapy (GET) but that they believed GET encouraged a pacing approach to generally increasing the patient's exercise capacity, which was completely unlike the LP, which was not an exercise therapy.

    They stated that CBT was a very broad field with very few accepted standard prescribed approaches, whereas the LP was a standardised training programme which meant a visit to a practitioner anywhere in the world should result in receiving the same training, material, tools and coaching. They said one of the core CBT approaches was a conscious evaluation, engagement and self-analysis of how the individual had been thinking about something; a recognition of how that might not have been the best way of thinking about it and a consideration of other ways of thinking. They explained that this was very unlike the LP approach which worked in training the individual to recognise any unhelpful ways of thinking; to disengage, avoid self-analysis and immersion in those ways of thinking and instead utilise a set of specific and standardised LP questions and physical movements to create new approaches to situations.

    3. Phil Parker Group said the first reference to the NHS on the website was in relation to the feasibility study that they had undertaken with a specialist CFS/ME service for children based at the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, which was an NHS hospital. They said the only other reference to the NHS was in the answer to the FAQ "Why isn't the Lightning Process available on the NHS?" They did not believe any information on the website contained an express or implied claim that LP had been endorsed by the NHS but said they were prepared to remove the reference to attempting to make the LP available on the NHS in future from the FAQ page.

    4. Phil Parker Group reiterated their view that, because LP was a training programme, it could not cure anything. They said the website did nothing more than accurately and responsibly offer general information about conditions that the LP might be of some use for.

    They said the statement on their website that read "We have seen a number of people with all the different types of MS reporting impressive results when using the LP" was accurate and that they had documented results from a proof of concepts study carried out in conjunction with the Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre (MSRC), as well as their LP Outcome Measures Study and individual testimonials. They said the studies supported the fact that LP was an appropriate and documented approach to teaching people tools to assist them to some degree with their MS.

    They also stated that the evidence provided in relation to LP and ME/CFS formed part of an evidence base that showed brain training approaches could influence the key systems that needed support in people with MS.

    They said there was overwhelming evidence that brain-training approaches were suitable for IBS/Digestive issues and food intolerances. They provided several abstracts of studies which looked at the role of hypnotherapy in the treatment of people with IBS. They believed those showed that hypnotherapy had a positive impact on the symptoms of IBS and that the LP, which trained participants in self-hypnosis and other brain training techniques, was therefore an appropriate approach to teaching people tools to assist them to some degree with their IBS. They believed that the research mentioned in relation to ME/CFS showed the effect of brain training techniques on the function of the immune system and supported the idea that the mind could dampen heightened immune responses such as chemical sensitivities.

    They provided links to two studies which looked at the application of hypnosis in the treatment of anorexia, which they believed supported the claim that LP was an appropriate and documented approach to teaching people tools to assist them to some degree with their eating disorders. They provided an abstract of a study which documented techniques of brain training in supporting ex-addicts in recovery and they said the positive outcomes from the LP Outcome Measures Research supported the use of LP for addiction. They also provided an abstract of a study that investigated the comparative effectiveness of hypnosis and CBT on depression and they believed the study and the results of their own Snapshot Survey supported the fact that the LP was an appropriate and documented approach to teaching people tools to assist them to some degree with their depression.

    They stated that a number of the conditions referred to on the landing page, including anxiety, stress, phobias, OCD, low self-esteem and FM/chronic pain were accepted as being within the remit of psychosomatic practitioners. They reiterated that all LP practitioners were clinically trained hypnotherapists and could therefore refer to those conditions, so long as there was no promise of cure. They added that many of those conditions had also been shown to be affected positively by the LP Outcome Measures Study.

    Assessment

    The ASA noted that Phil Parker Group referred to LP as a training programme rather than a therapy and that none of the pages of the website expressly stated that LP could cure a specific medical condition. However, we noted that each page of the website stated "Welcome to this site, I do hope these pages [or "which I hope"] will answer some of your questions about [medical condition] and the Lightning Process (LP)". We noted that each page included a disclaimer that stated "Due to the nature of the [Lightning Process] training we cannot guarantee results as everyone is different, however we have received a considerable amount of positive feedback from clients with the varied symptoms that many people with [medical condition] can experience" and that the pages for CFS/ME, IBS/digestive issues, food and chemical intolerances, depression, FM/chronic pain, phobias/anxiety/stress and OCD included an introduction to a customer testimonial which explained the positive experience those customers had with the LP.

    We considered that references to the LP and its potential benefit for those who suffered from the named medical conditions constituted objective claims for medical efficacy and that the Code rules specific to medical treatments were therefore applicable. Because neither CAP nor the ASA had previously seen evidence that the LP could be effective in treating the medical conditions listed, we considered that a high level body of relevant evidence was needed to prove the claims.

    1. Upheld
    We considered that visitors to the website were likely to understand from the statements such as "I hope these pages will answer some of your questions about this illness [CFS/ME] and about the Lightning Process (LP)", "Our survey found that 81.3%* of clients report that they no longer have the issues they came with by day three of the LP course" and "Due to the nature of the training the Lightning Process cannot guarantee results as everyone is different, however we have received a considerable amount of positive feedback from clients with the varied symptoms that many people with chronic health issues experience" that the symptoms of their CFS/ME were likely to be gone by the end of the three-day LP course and that they would have gained the knowledge to help them prevent those symptoms returning (with support from time to time from their LP practitioner).

    Although we acknowledged that self-assessment questionnaires were commonly used to assess outcome measures in trials relating to CFS/ME, we noted that the LP Outcome Measures Study was not controlled and had been designed only to provide preliminary outcome measures which could be used to support an application for funding for a larger-scale randomised control trial (RCT).

    Although we had not seen the full study, we understood that the pilot study conducted with the International Centre For Wellness Research reported positive results from a sample of 17 participants. However, we understood that the study was not controlled and had concluded that further investigation was necessary, with a larger sample size with wider inclusion criteria.

    We had seen only a summary of the LP Snapshot Survey. We had no reason to doubt the accuracy of the reporting. However, we noted that participants need only have been self-diagnosed to participate in what was a self-assessment survey which was not controlled. Similarly, we noted that the trials conducted by the ME Association, the Brighton and Sussex Medical School and the Sussex & Kent CFS/ME Society reported positive results but were self-assessment studies and had not been controlled. We considered that those studies and surveys did not constitute a suitably robust body of evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the LP in the treatment of CFS/ME.
    Because of that, we concluded that the CFS/ME page of the website was likely to mislead.

    On this point, the website breached CAP Code (Edition 12) rules 3.1 (Misleading advertising), 3.7 (Substantiation) and 12.1 (Medicines, medical devices, health-related products and beauty products).

    2. Not upheld
    We understood that GET and CBT were the two treatments for CFS/ME used within the NHS. We understood that GET was a structured exercise programme that aimed to increase gradually how long a person could carry out a physical activity. We understood that the LP involved only low intensity physical movements, the purpose of which were not to expand the body's capacity for exercise, and we considered that it therefore differed significantly from GET.

    Although we considered that there appeared to be similarities between CBT and the LP, in that both attempted to provide people with new ways of thinking about the issues presented by their illness, we noted LP incorporated elements of hypnosis and meditation, as well as low intensity physical movement, and we considered that it therefore differed sufficiently from CBT to be regarded as "unique".

    On this point, we investigated the website under CAP Code (Edition 12) rules 3.1 (Misleading advertising) and 3.7 (Substantiation), but did not find it in breach.

    3. Not upheld
    We noted that the NHS was referred to on the FAQ page of the website, where an explanation was offered as to why LP was not available on the NHS. Although we considered that the FAQ page implied that it was for practical reasons rather than reasons of documented medical effectiveness that the LP was not available on the NHS, we did not consider that it implied the LP had been endorsed by the NHS.

    Although we noted that the LP was working with only one NHS hospital on a study intended to determine whether it was possible to recruit young people with CFS/ME into a study to compare specialist medical treatment with specialist medical treatment plus the LP, we noted that the website provided a prominent link to further information and we therefore concluded that the reference to the feasibility study did not imply that the LP had been endorsed by the NHS.

    On this point, we investigated the website under CAP Code (Edition 12) rule 3.1 (Misleading advertising), but did not find it in breach.

    4. Upheld
    We considered that visitors to the website would interpret the customer testimonials, the results quoted from the LP Snapshot Survey and the other claims made for the LP on the MS, IBS/digestive issues, food and chemical intolerances, eating disorders, addiction, depression, FM/chronic pain, phobias/anxiety/stress, low self-esteem and OCD pages of the website to mean that the LP could be effective in treating those conditions.

    We noted that the LP Outcome Measures Study showed a positive impact of the LP for those who suffered with MS, addiction, depression, FM/chronic pain, anxiety, low self-esteem, OCD and conditions classed as "Other/Unknown". However, as we noted at point 1 above, we did not consider that study to be strong evidence of the effectiveness of the LP.

    We noted that the other study we had seen that looked specifically at the effectiveness of the LP in treating MS was also not a controlled clinical trial. The majority of the study abstracts we received looked at the performance of treatment methods other than the LP for different conditions and we had not seen an extrapolation by an appropriate expert of the findings from those studies that demonstrated they could be relevant in support of the claims for the LP, which was identified as a unique process which, while drawing from elements of osteopathy and hypnotherapy, did not hypnotise participants or involve any physical manipulation. In the absence of adequately controlled trials relating specifically to the impact of the LP in the treatment of people with MS, IBS/digestive issues, food and chemical intolerances, eating disorders, addictions, depression, FM/chronic pain, phobias/anxiety/stress, low self-esteem and OCD, we considered that the website was likely to mislead consumers regarding the benefits of the LP in the treatment of people with those conditions.

    In addition to the fact that we had not seen robust evidence in support of the efficacy claims, we noted that the CAP Code stated that ads should not contain references to medical conditions for which medical supervision should be sought because of the risk that it might discourage readers from seeking essential treatment for those conditions. We noted that the ad made reference to conditions including MS, eating disorders, addiction, depression and OCD and we acknowledged that depression and OCD were generally regarded as conditions capable of being treated under the supervision of suitably qualified psychosomatic practitioners. We understood that Phil Parker was a registered hypnotherapist, osteopath and psychotherapist, however, we noted that the website was intended to direct prospective customers to find their local LP practitioner. We noted that LP practitioners need only be trained in hypnotherapy and could therefore practice without having attained the necessary qualifications to treat those conditions.

    Because Phil Parker Group had not supplied evidence to show that the LP could treat MS, eating disorders, addiction, depression and OCD and because reference to them could discourage readers from seeking essential treatment under the supervision of a suitably qualified health professional for them, we concluded that the claims were misleading for that reason also.

    On this point, the website breached CAP Code (Edition 12) rules 3.1 (Misleading advertising), 3.7 (Substantiation) and 12.1 and 12.2 (Medicines, medical devices, health-related products and beauty products).

    Action

    The claims on the website should not appear again in their current form. We told Phil Parker Group to ensure they did not make medical claims for the LP unless they were supported with robust evidence. We also told them not to refer to conditions for which advice should be sought from suitably qualified health professionals.
  6. Marlène

    Marlène Senior Member

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    Just stumbled upon this thread. What a horror. It is a sick world out there. I hope the children will find the inner strength to overcome the doubts that will be planted into their little heads and get the medical attention they need.
  7. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Somewhere near Glasgow, Scotland
    "8 out of 10 cats said their owners sure as hell didn't get cured of Multiple Sclerosis by this Whisker Process...the other two were too knackered to talk to us about their issues or any other damn thing"
    :p

    (joke based off old British TV advert, hehe)
  8. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    1.

    4.

    Excellent news. Really good to hear about the ASA taking notice of claims made without robust scientific evidence; and trying to ensure that practitioners are more suitably qualified.

    Good decision. I wonder if Parker has taken it all down now? Or if this will affect his empire detrimentally? Gods I hope so.
  9. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch dxrevisionwatch.com

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    This is the third ASA for Phil Parker:

    http://asa.org.uk/ASA-action/Adjudications.aspx?SearchTerms=Phil Parker Group#2

    Phil Parker Group. 18th January 2012.
    Phil Parker Group. 18th May 2011


    plus

    http://asa.org.uk/ASA-action/Adjudications/2010/6/Withinspiration/TF_ADJ_48612.aspx

    Withinspiration
    An internet sponsored link stated “Chronic Fatigue Recovery. End the cycle of ME/CFS: Get Well! with The Lightning Process”.
    Date: 16 June 2010
    Decision: Upheld

    So that's four LP related Ajudicatons since June 2010.

    ----------------------------------

    An account from 2011 on behalf of person who tried LP:

    http://weare3forme.posterous.com/the-lightning-process-and-me
    February 23, 2011

    The Lightning Process and M.E.
    Firestormm likes this.
  10. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Phil Parker's "theory" is completely incompatible with the body's biochemistry.

    I've been in correspondence with his acolyte, Amir Norris over this.
    Sadly, I deleted the responses from my in-box years ago. :mad:
    I had found out about LP (and something else, Reverse or Mickel therapy) before I ever started posting on any forums and learning a bit more about my illness, and I decided to look at them closely.

    My investigations swiftly revealed "serious quackery, ignore this BS"; and I thought it would be safe to dismiss and forget about them as much, as I dismiss "psychic surgery" and other forms of magic/superstition.
  11. Min

    Min Senior Member

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    Invest in ME have posted this on their facebook page in response to the ASA judgment:

  12. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch dxrevisionwatch.com

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    http://www.healinghawk.com/prospectushealing.htm

    "…Phil Parker is already known to many as an inspirational teacher, therapist, healer and author. His personal healing journey began when, whilst working with his patients as an osteopath. He discovered that their bodies would suddenly tell him important bits of information about them and their past, which to his surprise turned out to be factually correct! He further developed this ability to step into other people’s bodies over the years to assist them in their healing with amazing results. After working as a healer for 20 years, Phil Parker has developed a powerful and magical program to help you unlock your natural healing abilities. If you feel drawn to these courses then you are probably ready to join…"

    "As a child, Vicci Hands was extremely scared by hearing voices that no one else could; the fact that what these spirit voices said came true just made things worse. She was fortunate enough to come across a number of positive influences and mentors who helped understand how to harness her abilities for healing. As a result of her own experiences, she has a very down to earth approach to the subject. This, combined with her background in education, makes her a very powerful and approachable teacher."​

    Divination, tarot, dousing with pendulums and past lives. Parker is a collaborator in, and adviser to an REC approved scientific research trial being undertaken under the auspicies of an NHS paediatric CFS/ME clinic which, if the resulting paper is peer reviewed and journal published, would give Parker a listing in PubMed.


    "8 Using Divination.
    "This module looks at the use of divination medicine cards and tarot as a way of making predictions. From a healing perspective, divination is useful in creating a strong connection with healing/spirit guides. It can also help you to understand the spiritual background of a client, which may be essential in helping with a problem. If a client comes to you feeling they have been cursed, you may need additional information about their past lives in order to help them and this is where the use of tarot/medicine cards is beneficial.

    "Healing can also be a time of change and new beginnings- recognition of strengths, talents and a time to let go of the past. Divination can help with all these important areas.

    "In this module the anatomic section focuses on the digestion and urinary systems.
    In the practical session for this module, the students are required to make predictions about their client, using tarot/medicine cards and then discuss the relevance of the cards they have picked and/or treat that client accordingly."


    This material comes from a webpage advertising residential healing training courses for healers by Parker and Vicci Hands.

    It dates from around 2007 and was still online until at least September 2010, when it was given exposure on my site and also on Facebook. The web page and the Healinghawk site have since been taken offline.

    The full page for the healing course is archived on the "WayBack Machine" here:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20080326165601/http://www.healinghawk.com/prospectushealing.htm
  13. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Sickening and sadly, not surprising. Thank-you so much for archiving this stuff!
  14. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    So it seems Magical Medicine has taken on new meaning. :confused:
    taniaaust1 and Firestormm like this.
  15. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Amir Norris - i thought that name rang a bell. He runs courses in the South Wales area - my NHS counsellor tried very hard to get me to see him last year. Needless to say the counselling realtionship didnt go too well - hours of arguing with him over the nature of M.E and at one point being told ' it's not that bad, surely?' This guy works for the NHS and tells me that other PWME he has seen who were worse off than than me had been 'cured ' by Amir. He knows this because he has seen them since and they are no longer walking with sticks etc.

    It would be great to see people claiming money back from Phil Parker and other LP practitioners for having been misled over the product they were buying.

    Justy.
  16. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    http://www.fatigueanswers.com/me-cfs-recovery-courses.html

    If anything on that link relates to the LP. I'd be interested in knowing. Charles Shepherd was asking on FB yesterday for examples whereby people using such things make claims pertaining to medical conditions and how effective they believed their interventions to be. I think he's going back to the ASA with additional evidence or something.

    So if you come across any sites that make claims similar to that of Phil Parker it could be worth letting Charles know. I do believe that the ASA are taking a much closer interest generally in alternate claims. It seems to be something that reflects other wider concerns too. I've noticed more science being used to challenge several alternative remedies of late, but the ASA is about promotional/advertising and unsubstantiated claims relating to effectiveness.
    justy and Min like this.
  17. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Scotland
    I was trying to contact PP to find out about LP when I ended up with Amir Norris.
    They're in cahoots, whatever they call whatever it is they're promoting.
  18. kermit frogsquire

    kermit frogsquire *****

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    It should be noted that the ASA adjudication against Phil Parker was achieved, as Invest in ME make clear, by the hard work of patients. It should also be made clear that legal actions against Philip Parker were suspended on the advice of trading standards until the ASA made their ruling.

    Now that the ASA has ruled on the subject, several organisations are supporting legal action against Mr Parker. This is fantasic news, and hopefully I will be sent further details shortly and will post them on this forum. Anyone that wishes to have their money refunded because they were conned into buying the product because of the misleading advertising may well be able to join the action.
    ukxmrv, alex3619, taniaaust1 and 2 others like this.
  19. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    1,684
    Somewhere near Glasgow, Scotland
    The wheels of justice grind slow, but exceedingly fine!
  20. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I just stumbled upon this old letter from Crawley:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/?p=3163

    It would be interesting to know exactly what information about the LP was given to children in order to allow them to give fully informed.

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