1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
The Pathway to Prevention (P2P) for ME/CFS: A Dangerous Process
Gabby Klein gives an overview of the P2P process, shedding light on the pitfalls with advice as to what we can do in protest ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

"Letters will be sent to article’s corresponding author who will represent the final say on matter"

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Dolphin, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,652
    Likes:
    5,374
    ETA: I may have misinterpreted this. It may not mean the corresponding author has a veto, just that they anything that is published, they will get a chance to reply to and hence have the final say.

    http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/rftg-article-types.pdf


    I was just looking at guidelines for authors for Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior


    I think I recall the renegade psychologist James C. Coyne mentioning this practice (and not being happy with it - possibly in the contest of a specific journal). Anyone know how widespread it is? I wonder whether some journals use this policy sometimes, without explicitly saying it.

    Can't say I like the policy, put perhaps authors only get so much say in the matter?
  2. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,208
    Likes:
    5,269
    I feel a [edit - premature] despondent disgust. This should not be how things are done.
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,074
    Likes:
    10,930
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    This is antiscience. Suddenly I am very concerned about this journal.

    PS In response to the alternative explanation, that the authors always get to reply to the letter, I actually have no problem with it. The situation needs to be clarified. If they have a right of reply, but are not required to and the letter will still be published, is a desirable practice. Authors should have a right of reply.
    Sean likes this.
  4. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,192
    Likes:
    1,862
    Completely unacceptable. o_O
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,266
    Likes:
    1,675
    Australia
    I don't quite understand, are they saying the author of the original article has the say of whether to publish, or simply the final say in the published correspondence?
    Dolphin and Simon like this.
  6. Simon

    Simon

    Messages:
    1,310
    Likes:
    4,058
    Monmouth, UK
    If by 'the matter' they mean the issue raised by the letter, than that's just standard practice: the authors always get final say. I think this is probably the case since they add that Letters will be published on a space-available basis.

    If the authors have a veto on what gets published that would be more unusual, I think, and pretty awful. In the James Coyne case the authors didn't have a direct veto, but the journal had a policy that they wouldn't publish anything critical without a response from the author. The author refused to respond, effectively exercising a veto. James Coyne wrote to the journal asking them to reconsider their absurd policy, and they did - as well as giving him enough space to write a proper critique.
  7. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,208
    Likes:
    5,269
    I think that you're right that I misinterpreted this (sorry fatigue journal... irritable before bed!)... however, it does also sound like their policy places them in the same bind that Coyne came upon, even if this was accidental, rather than a deliberate attempt to allow authors a veto on correspondence. Hopefully, were a situation to arise in which an author did refuse to provide a final say, the journal would just publish the critical correspondence anyway.

    Also, I'd be interested to know how much say authors do have over what letters are printed in response to their articles.
  8. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,652
    Likes:
    5,374
    I've adjusted the original post based on the alternative interpretation.
  9. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,652
    Likes:
    5,374
    I would too. I found with one particular group of authors, some of e-letters which normally were published, were published less frequently. I could be wrong but it seems possible the authors were bad-mouthing me and/or what I'd written to the respective editors and/or the editors had given them some sort of say in the matter. And this made me also think this might happen with some full letters.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page