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Lack of protein causing me to crash?

Discussion in 'Post-Exertional Malaise, Fatigue, and Crashes' started by TrixieStix, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. TrixieStix

    TrixieStix Senior Member

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    Tonight I had a very sudden crash that I believe was due to having not eaten enough protein for my body's needs. After I ate the piece of salmon my husband cooked for me I slowly began to come out of the crash and normalize (my normal of course). It was not simply that I had not eaten because I had eaten. And it was nothing like a blood sugar crash.

    Of course I have no way of proving that, and I may be totally wrong, but I wondered if anybody else has experienced anything similar?
     
    Valentijn, xrayspex and mirshine like this.
  2. mirshine

    mirshine Senior Member

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    I definitely find if I don't eat protein at lunch and dinner that I get worse. I now keep a bowl of hard boiled eggs in the fridge if I feel lacking.
     
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  3. xrayspex

    xrayspex Senior Member

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    I noticed yesterday, I was having bad energy pain day, that after I had some bone broth soup with little bits of meat in it that I had simmered all day that I felt much better, was interesting!
     
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  4. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    I tend to need methionine and tyrosine. They help in different ways with fatigue. Also, one of the recent studies said we need more amino acids.

    I tend to do well on 1.4g/kg of protein, confirmed by lab results.
     
    keenly likes this.
  5. keenly

    keenly

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    What about the ammonia released from the protein though?
     
  6. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    I have SNPs that predispose me to higher ammonia levels, so I do monitor my ammonia level. It's been on the higher end of the normal range, but hasn't become a problem. If it does, then we deal with it. For now, my body seems to want the amino acids. I eat plenty of protein and supplement those I'm short on.
     
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  7. keenly

    keenly

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    What is the best way to monitor ammonia levels?
     
  8. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    I do an annual Genova Diagnostics NutrEval, which has a $154 prepay in my area. Results take awhile, but the info is valuable, giving all my amino acid levels, B vitamins, antioxidants, Krebs cycle, toxicity, and a lot of other good stuff. Over time, my doctor's and I have learned what my tendencies are, and it's given good info, sometimes surprising, that's been helpful in my treatment.

    A regular lab could test, too, and then there's how you and your secretions smell ... and monitoring your symptoms.
     
  9. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    If ammonia is an issue, one can take l-citrulline N-acetylene-cysteine, or glutathione.
     

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