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Kinesiophobia and maladaptive coping strategies prevent improvements in pain catastrophizing followi

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by JaimeS, Jul 19, 2016.

  1. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Full title:
    Kinesiophobia and maladaptive coping strategies prevent improvements in pain catastrophizing following pain neuroscience education in fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome: Pooled results from 2 randomized controlled trials
    A. Malfliet, J. Van Oosterwijck, M. Meeus, B. Cagnie, L. Danneels, M. Dolphens, R. Buyl, J. Nijs
    Intergrating Research into practice

    http://www.manualtherapyjournal.com/article/S1356-689X(16)30281-8/abstract

    Other, [very] similar study by the same set out authors discussed here and here.

    Can anyone locate full text?

    -J
     
  2. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    @JaimeS Can't find the full text, but I did find some more info on what they call 'pain neurophysiology education'. (brace yourself)
    (my bolding)

    I don't know how many times I can say the exact same thing about this group of so called researchers: drivel drivel drivel. So sick of this nonsense!

    There's more, if you really feel like ingesting more drivel: http://www.paininmotion.be/blog/det...neuroscience-education-physiotherapy-practice
     
  3. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    As far as kinesiophobia goes, I'm continually asking myself if I really couldn't do more. Do I really need to be spending so many hours lying down? And when I had to get out of my house to avoid the tree-lopping noise, spending the day in my car, at a movie, lying down at a park, and still arriving home too early, to 1/2 hour of chain saw noise: I was a wreck. I needed anti-inflammatories, and had a very disrupted sleep. Barely moving the next day.

    I'm certain that the noise was at least as much to blame as my need to be away. I've been asking myself from the first moment, whether I can't really do more, whether it's not just become a habitual life style choice. I only wish it were so. These jerks just won't quit their bs.:devil:

    I've managed to get on top of my most awful symptoms these last 4 years, I've learned to manage myself to have no crashes for about 2 years. Could I do more if I just weren't afraid? If I hadn't learned from the lessons of the many people here who've done permanent damage by over activity, I could easily be far more disabled than I am now.
     
  4. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    That bit you bolded:


    I mean wow. Just wow.
     
  5. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    Brain washing and wishful thinking makes pain go away. Pain that wasn't even really there to begin with. That pretty much sums it up I think. :cautious:
     
  6. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    @JaimeS At the top of the page on this link it says the article comes out in Sept.
    http://www.manualtherapyjournal.com/article/S1356-689X(16)30281-8/abstract
     
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  7. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Except we're all missing the best part:

    They say it doesn't work.

    In fact, the point of this paper appears to be to state that pain education did not help a particular group of patients.

    Why? Because it's voodoo to presume that one's psychology has absolute control over one's body's responses?

    Nope -- because the patients in question were too 'maladaptive'.

    So, even worse than what we're saying here is their true message: "Pain can be banished by right-thinking. The patients were incapable of right-thinking. Therefore, they continue to have pain."

    -J
     
  8. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    I'll add that I'm actually really shocked to see some of the authors here. Meeus, Nijs, and Van Oosterwijck at least have done bona fide biomedical research:

    Nijs, J., Meeus, M., & De Meirleir, K. (2006, August). Chronic musculoskeletal pain in chronic fatigue syndrome: Recent developments and therapeutic implications. Elsevier Manual Therapy, 11(3), 187-191. doi:10.1016/j.math.2006.03.008

    Nijs, J., Nees, A., Paul, L., De Kooning, M., Ickmans, K., Meeus, M., & Van Oosterwijck, J. (2014). Altered immune response to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: A systematic literature review. Exerc Immunol Rev., 20, 94-116. Retrieved June 30, 2016, from http://www.medizin.uni-tuebingen.de/transfusionsmedizin/institut/eir/content/2014/94/article.pdf

    KDM is probably having a heart attack as we speak.
     
  9. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    They've gone off the deep long ago and have produced nothing but drivel since then.
     
  10. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    What a shame! Must be pretty recent; one of those articles was 2014.
     
  11. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    "Another amazing finding from a randomized controlled trial of our group..."

    An amazing finding?

    Sounds less like Science and more like Sales.
     
  12. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Babble blending with science is still babble.
     
  13. Aurator

    Aurator Senior Member

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    Interesting that they place this last in a list of three benefits. It's a climactic list, you understand - the last being the most important. However bad it is, any "science" that promises to take the strain off government health budgets is a good thing - for those in charge of government health budgets, at any rate.
     
  14. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    The article from 2014 is a literature review of biomed research, in which they reach the conclusion that the evidence for an altered immune response in ME/CFS is only moderate.
    Sounds like cherry picking in order to find the result they wanted: CFS has no biomed base. With every single study they have produced in latest years they are just trying to make a case for their own treatment, and a case for the governement to get them to force that treatment upon us.
     
  15. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    Related study:

    "Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed decreased TS after exercise, both after paracetamol and placebo (P < 0.05). In patients with CFS/FM, results were less univocal. A nonsignificant decrease in TS was only observed after taking paracetamol. CPM responses to exercise are inconclusive, but seem to worsen after exercise."

    Nijs et al. "Endogenous Pain Modulation in Response to Exercise in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Comorbid Fibromyalgia, and Healthy Controls: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial"
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/papr.12181/abstract
     
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  16. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Me too, ahmo. I keep trying. I don't know when that will stop. Probably never.

    The other day, I went on walks around my property (my family's is somewhat large). My goal was to walk for a half an hour, but in increments: 800 steps. The next time, 600 steps. The next time, 400 steps. The next time, 200 steps. You get the idea. Throughout the day. Because when I was in the Baltimore/Washington D.C. area, I walked many times in brief bursts and didn't crash. City walking, where you park and walk two blocks. It's really 5 minutes of mild exercise, so I figured I could artificially repeat that experience.

    But apparently part of my issue is environmental. It wasn't the short bursts of walking that meant I wasn't done in -- it was where I did them.

    The whole "patients are invested in their illness" narrative doesn't jive with me. It's not just that I want so badly to be well -- I want so badly to be active and well. I don't fear exercise, I keep sidling up to it like it's a wild animal that won't hurt me so long as I approach it quietly.
     
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  17. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    I consider B-level evidence to actually be pretty good. I'll re-read this work with an eye for bias, however.
     
  18. eastcoast12

    eastcoast12 Senior Member

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    Lol. I just sent my paper for peer review. It should be published any day. This is my study.
    Does survival fear prevent people from surviving from jumping off a bridge.
    People-100
    Died-98
    Lived-2
    Even though the study showed that results were small, there is a powerful message to take away from this. Research has shown that you in fact survive a jumping off of bridges.
     
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  19. eastcoast12

    eastcoast12 Senior Member

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    There's not a good enough face palm gif on the Internet to reply to this.
     
    JaimeS and ahmo like this.
  20. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    I'm sure everyone will be delighted to know that this has now been published, 11 months after being accepted by the journal and 16 months after having been sent to the journal. Behind a paywall but those who can access Sci-hub might be able to see all of this pyschobabble in it's full glory.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09593985.2017.1331481
     

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