A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
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KCL: Chronic fatigue syndrome. (treatment review) Sept 2015

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by WillowJ, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26415100

    BMJ Clin Evid.
    2015 Sep 28;2015. pii: 1101.
    Chronic fatigue syndrome.
    Cleare AJ1, Reid S, Chalder T, Hotopf M, Wessely S.
    Author information
    • 1King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, London, UK.
    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION:
    Chronic fatigue syndrome affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria of definition used, with women being at higher risk than men.

    METHODS AND OUTCOMES:
    We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of selected treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review).

    RESULTS:
    At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 169 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 86 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 71 studies and the further review of 15 full publications. Of the 15 full articles evaluated, two systematic reviews, one RCT, and one further follow-up report of an RCT were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 23 PICO combinations.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    In this systematic overview, we categorised the effectiveness of four interventions based on information relating to the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants, cognitive behavioural therapy, corticosteroids, and graded exercise therapy.
     
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  2. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Stop the harm. Start the research and treatment.

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    Has any one informed BMJ Clin Evid that they have published Wessely bullshit and should retract it to try to protect their journal's reputation which is in now if free fall?

    Peer reviewed? Evidently not.
     
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  3. Simon

    Simon

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    Curious, Simon Wessley is on record as saying he's retired from the field.
    Ah, maybe that explains it

    A little strange the conclusions (and results) report no conclusions or results: "We did a study".
    I thought there were guidelines on informative abstracts, so people can make some evaluation without paying for the full text.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
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  4. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    Guess they didn't think much of the recent AHRQ review so they had to do their own? Will be interesting to see how the conclusions differ.
     
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    They've had a review on the BMJ sites for years, possibly over a decade. This is presumably an update.
     
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  6. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

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    Although I think we can quite reliably guess what their conclusions were...somewhat foregone?
     
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